Arrest

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Possible Answers: STEM, STOP, NAB, NAIL, DETER, HALT, SEIZE, RUNIN, BUST, CURB, CUFF, COLLAR, PULLIN, HAULIN, PLACEBEHINDBARS.

Last seen on: –Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jul 18 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jun 12 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jan 5 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Nov 20 2018
Daily Celebrity Crossword – 10/11/18 Top 40 Thursday
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Aug 27 2018
Canadiana Crossword – Aug 20 2018
-Universal Crossword November 30 2017

Random information on the term “STEM”:

STEAM fields are science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, together with art. STEAM is designed to integrate STEM subjects and the art of design in education. These programs aim to teach students to think critically and have an engineering or design approach towards real-world problems while building on their mathematics and science base. STEAM programs add art to STEM curriculum by drawing on design principles and encouraging creative solutions.

One early founder of the STEAM initiative is Georgette Yakman,[who?] who in addition to raising the idea of adding the arts to the STEM acronym, claims to have found a formal way to link the subjects together and correspond them to the global socioeconomic world: “Science and Technology, interpreted through Engineering and the Arts, all based in elements of Mathematics.”[citation needed] She provides professional development training to individual educators and programs on how to use the STEAM framework.[citation needed] In 2009, Senator Mark Warner announced Yakman’s nomination as NCTC’s STEAM Teacher of the Year 2009.

STEM on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “STOP”:

In music, a double stop refers to the technique of playing two notes simultaneously on a bowed stringed instrument such as a violin, a viola, a cello, or a double bass. In performing a double stop, two separate strings are bowed or plucked simultaneously. Although the term itself suggests these strings are to be fingered (stopped), in practice one or both strings may be open.

A triple stop is the same technique applied to three strings; a quadruple stop applies to four strings. Double, triple, and quadruple stopping are collectively known as multiple stopping.

Early extensive examples of the double-stop and string chords appear in Carlo Farina’s Capriccio Stravagante from 1627, and in certain of the sonatas of Biagio Marini’s op. 8 of 1629.

On instruments with a curved bridge, it is difficult to bow more than two strings simultaneously. Early treatises make it clear that composers did not expect three notes to be played at once, even though the notes may be written in a way as to suggest this. Playing four notes at once is almost impossible. The normal way of playing three or four note chords is to sound the lower notes briefly and allow them to ring while the bow plays the upper notes (a broken chord). This gives the illusion of a true triple or quadruple stop. In forte, however, it is possible to play three notes at once, especially when bowed toward the fingerboard. With this technique more pressure than usual is needed on the bow, so this cannot be practiced in softer passages. This technique is mainly used in music with great force, such as the cadenza-like solo at the beginning of the last movement of Tchaikovsky’s violin concerto.


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STOP on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “NAB”:

National Assessment Banks, commonly referred to as NABs after the National Assessment Bank from which these assessments are selected by teachers, are internal assessments that form part of the Scottish Higher and Intermediate courses. These are assessed by a centre and are moderated by the Scottish Qualifications Authority. Candidates sitting a courses at Intermediate 1, Intermediate 2, Higher and Advanced Higher levels are required to have passed a NAB for each unit in order to sit the end of course examination.

Intermediate and Higher courses are divided into three units (or in some cases, such as Intermediate Physics, two whole units and two half units). Each pupil will sit the NAB after completing a particular unit. A pass in the NAB is required for the pupil to continue with the rest of the course and to sit the final exam. Each pupil is allowed a resit if they fail their first NAB, but if they fail the resit their individual situation will be considered by their teacher, who will then decide whether they are allowed to continue with the rest of the course.

NAB on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “NAIL”:

A nail is a horn-like envelope covering the tips of the fingers and toes in most primates and a few other mammals. Nails are similar to claws in other animals. Fingernails and toenails are made of a tough protective protein called keratin. This protein is also found in the hooves and horns of different animals.

The nail consists of the nail plate, the nail matrix and the nail bed below it, and the grooves surrounding it.

The matrix, sometimes called the matrix unguis, keratogenous membrane, nail matrix, or onychostroma, is the tissue (or germinal matrix) which the nail protects. It is the part of the nail bed that is beneath the nail and contains nerves, lymph and blood vessels. The matrix is responsible for producing cells that become the nail plate. The width and thickness of the nail plate is determined by the size, length, and thickness of the matrix, while the shape of the fingertip itself shows if the nail plate is flat, arched, or hooked. The matrix will continue to grow as long as it receives nutrition and remains in a healthy condition. As new nail plate cells are made, they push older nail plate cells forward; and in this way older cells become compressed, flat, and translucent. This makes the capillaries in the nail bed below visible, resulting in a pink color.

NAIL on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “HALT”:

A train station, railway station, railroad station, or depot (see below) is a railway facility where trains regularly stop to load or unload passengers or freight.

It generally consists of at least one track-side platform and a station building (depot) providing such ancillary services as ticket sales and waiting rooms. If a station is on a single-track line, it often has a passing loop to facilitate traffic movements. The smallest stations are most often referred to as “stops” or, in some parts of the world, as “halts” (flag stops).

Stations may be at ground level, underground, or elevated. Connections may be available to intersecting rail lines or other transport modes such as buses, trams or other rapid transit systems.

In Britain and other Commonwealth countries, traditional usage favours railway station or simply station, even though train station, which is often perceived as an Americanism, is now about as common as railway station; railroad station is not used, the term railroad being obsolete in the United States. In British usage, the word station is commonly understood to mean a railway station unless otherwise qualified.

HALT on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “CUFF”:

This category has the following 2 subcategories, out of 2 total.

The following 52 pages are in this category, out of 52 total. This list may not reflect recent changes (learn more).

CUFF on Wikipedia