Awestruck

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Possible Answers: RAPT, AGOG, AGAPE, SHAKEN, BLOWNAWAY.

Last seen on: –Daily Celebrity Crossword – 1/31/20 Sports Fan Friday
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jan 14 2020
LA Times Crossword 22 Dec 19, Sunday
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Dec 7 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jun 11 2019
Universal Crossword – Jun 2 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – May 30 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Mar 29 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Feb 8 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Feb 6 2019
NY Times Crossword 23 Dec 18, Sunday
Universal Crossword – Dec 16 2018
Daily Celebrity Crossword – 12/15/18 Smartypants Saturday
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Aug 7 2018
-Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – May 22 2018
-The Telegraph – Toughie Crossword – December 6 2017

Random information on the term “RAPT”:

Rapt is a 2009 French-Belgian dramatic film directed by Lucas Belvaux and starring Yvan Attal. It was nominated for 4 César Awards in 2010, including Best Film. It was released in France on 18 November 2009.

The film is inspired by the true story of the kidnapping of Édouard-Jean, 3rd Baron Empain, a very wealthy Hungarian-born Belgian aristocrat. The kidnapping of Baron Empain took place in Paris in January 1978.


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Stanislas, a wealthy and high-profile businessman who is kidnapped and held for ransom, had his finger mailed to his family with their demands. His family comes into conflict with the police and his corporate associates as they struggle to raise the money and pay off the kidnappers. His business associates refuse to pay the ransom, but agree to loan the family only as much as the family’s net worth. Stanislas is kept in darkness, unwashed, with little food, constantly threatened by his kidnappers.

Details of his mistresses and gambling emerge in the media. His wife, Francoise, and teenage daughters are traumatized. His business colleagues use it as an opportunity to turn against him. His mother rebukes his wife for not meeting his needs at home. Traumatized by his kidnapping Stanislas returns to his family expecting comfort and joy. Instead he is met by an equally distraught wife and two daughters who demand explanations for his affairs and gambling that has been splashed all over the media. Only his dog is happy to see him. His business associates are eager to tell him that he has been ousted as chairman of the board during his absence. The government suspects that he arranged his own kidnapping to pay off his debts and demands that he submit to questioning. In the last scene he signs papers selling his shares, and mentions to his lawyer that he is too tired to sign divorce papers that day. He opens the mail and finds a note from his previous kidnappers demanding 5 times his net worth.

RAPT on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “AGAPE”:

Affection, attraction, infatuation, or fondness is a “disposition or state of mind or body” that is often associated with a feeling or type of love. It has given rise to a number of branches of philosophy and psychology concerning emotion, disease, influence, and state of being. “Affection” is popularly used to denote a feeling or type of love, amounting to more than goodwill or friendship. Writers on ethics generally use the word to refer to distinct states of feeling, both lasting and spasmodic. Some contrast it with passion as being free from the distinctively sensual element.

Even a very simple demonstration of affection can have a broad variety of emotional reactions, from embarrassment to disgust to pleasure and annoyance. It also has a different physical effect on the giver and the receiver.

More specifically, the word has been restricted to emotional states, the object of which is a living thing such as a human or animal. Affection is compared with passion, from the Greek “pathos”. As such it appears in the writings of French philosopher René Descartes, Dutch philosopher Baruch Spinoza, and most of the writings of early British ethicists. However, on various grounds (e.g., that it does not involve anxiety or excitement and that it is comparatively inert and compatible with the entire absence of the sensuous element), it is generally and usefully distinguished from passion. In this narrower sense the word has played a great part in ethical systems, which have spoken of the social or parental affections as in some sense a part of moral obligation. For a consideration of these and similar problems, which depend ultimately on the degree in which the affections are regarded as voluntary, see H. Sidgwick, Methods of Ethics pp. 345–349.

AGAPE on Wikipedia