Bar

This time we are looking on the crossword clue for: Bar.
it’s A 3 letters crossword puzzle definition. See the possibilities below.

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Possible Answers: RAIL, BAN, SHUT, ESTOP, INGOT, PUB, SHOAL, SALOON, IMPEDE, STRIPE, TAVERN, BLOCK, CANTINA, MEASURE, HINDER, TAPROOM, FORBID, KEEPOUT, MUSICALNOTATION, EXCLUDE, PROHIBIT, LEGALPROFESSION, POLEVAULTERSAIM, MIXOLOGISTSSITE, COCKTAILLOUNGE, ATTORNEYSHURDLE, UNDERWATERKNOLL, LEGALFRATERNITY, CAKEOFBATHSOAP, AFTERHOURSJOINT.

Last seen on: –Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jan 25 2020
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jan 15 2020
LA Times Crossword 28 Dec 19, Saturday
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jul 5 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Dec 24 2018
The Washington Post Crossword – Dec 12 2018
LA Times Crossword 12 Dec 18, Wednesday
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Sep 3 2018
-The Washington Post Crossword – Jun 1 2018
LA Times Crossword 1 Jun 2018, Friday
-Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Nov 27 2017
-Metro Crossword November 25 2017

Random information on the term “RAIL”:

Rail is an English magazine on the subject of current rail transport in Great Britain. It is published every two weeks by Bauer Consumer Media and is available in the transport sections of many British newsagents. It is targeted primarily at the enthusiast market (those whose hobby is railways, rather than their occupation), but also covers business issues, often in depth.

Rail is more than three decades old, and was known as Rail Enthusiast from its launch in 1981 until 1988. It is one of only two railway magazines that increased its circulation in 2012 (the other being The Railway Magazine, published monthly, which Rail outperforms overall). It has had roughly the same cover design for at least a decade, with a capitalised italic red RAIL along the top of the front cover.

Rail is customarily critical of railway institutions, including the Rail Delivery Group, the Office of Rail and Road, as well as, since it assumed greater railway powers, the Department for Transport. Rail’s’ continuing campaigns include one against advertising and media images showing celebrities and others walking between the rails (an unsafe practice) and another against weeds on railways.


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RAIL on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “BAN”:

Balinese or simply Bali is a Malayo-Polynesian language spoken by 3.3 million people (as of 2000[update]) on the Indonesian island of Bali, as well as northern Nusa Penida, western Lombok and eastern Java. Most Balinese speakers also know Indonesian. Balinese itself is not mutually intelligible with Indonesian, but may be understood by Javanese speakers after some exposure.[citation needed]

In 2011, the Bali Cultural Agency estimates that the number of people still using Balinese language in their daily lives on the Bali Island does not exceed 1 million, as in urban areas their parents only introduce Indonesian language or even English, while daily conversations in the institutions and the mass media have disappeared. The written form of the Balinese language is increasingly unfamiliar and most Balinese people use the Balinese language only as a spoken tool with mixing of Indonesian language in their daily conversation. But in the transmigration areas outside Bali Island, Balinese language is extensively used and believed to play an important role in the survival of the language.

BAN on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “PUB”:

Pub Is the debut album by the British band Denzil.

Official Website: www.denzilpub.co.uk
MySpace: www.myspace.com/denzilpub
YouTube: www.youtube.com/user/denzilpub

PUB on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “STRIPE”:

A stripe is a line or band that differs in color or tone from an adjacent area. Stripes are a group of such lines.

As a pattern (more than one stripe together), stripes are commonly seen in nature, food, emblems, clothing, and elsewhere.

Two-toned stripes inherently draw one’s attention, and as such are used to signal hazards. They are used in road signs, barricade tape, and thresholds.

In nature, as with the zebra, stripes may have developed through natural selection to produce motion dazzle.[not in citation given]

Stripes may give appeal to certain foods. One example is the candy cane.

For hundreds of years, stripes have been used in clothing. Striped clothing has frequently had negative symbolism in Western cultures. Historian Michel Pastoureau explores the cultural history of these design decisions in the book, The Devil’s Cloth.

Stripes on garment first appeared in the Medieval times. During that era, only prisoners, criminals, clowns, prostitutes, hangmen, etc. were seen wearing a black and white stripped garment. However, by the end of the nineteenth century, a new definition of stripes was created by Queen Victoria. The queen dressed her son a sailor suit during a Royal Yacht boarding event. Stripes were no longer just associated with “someone evil.” Stripes were then connected with words such as “marine” and “sea”. Navy blue and white stripes were adopted by swimmers on their bathing suits. At the beginning of the twentieth century, the stripe fashion became mainstream again. Coco Chanel was inspired by the workers’ uniform during her trip to the French Rivera, and she started to apply the “Navy and White Strips” into her designs. In the 50s, movie starts were seen wearing striped shirts through the media. During the 60s and 70s, more and more people started to wear striped shirts as the garment was seen as a symbol of rebellion.

STRIPE on Wikipedia