Bounce

This time we are looking on the crossword clue for: Bounce.
it’s A 6 letters crossword puzzle definition. See the possibilities below.

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Possible Answers: ELAN, OUST, ECHO, PEP, HOP, DASH, LILT, FIRE, EJECT, CAROM, BOOT, EVICT, DAP, VIGOR, DRIBBLE, RICOCHET.

Last seen on: –The Washington Post Crossword – Feb 15 2020
LA Times Crossword 15 Feb 20, Saturday
NY Times Crossword 15 Nov 18, Thursday
-The Washington Post Crossword – June 3 2018
LA Times Crossword 3 Jun 2018, Sunday

Random information on the term “ELAN”:

Elan Atias (born September 21, 1975) is an American Jewish, singer/songwriter, reggae singer.

Atias performed with The Wailers, which had been the backing band for Bob Marley, on and off from 1997 to 2010. He was signed to London Records under the WMG umbrella in January 2000. He was featured on the Sex and the City soundtrack and his song “Dreams Come True” was his first big radio hit. In 2004 he teamed with Gwen Stefani on a song for the 50 First Dates soundtrack called “Slave to Love”. Stefani had Elan feature on her remix of her number one single “Hollaback Girl” called “DanceHollaback”, produced by Tony Kanal. In 2005, teamed up with Algerian Rai singer Cheb Khaled and Carlos Santana on a song called “Love to the People” for Khaled’s album titled Ya Rayi. A tour of North America followed with an All Star line-up with the likes of K.C. Porter, Don Was, Walfredo Reyes Jr and Carlos Santana. In June 2006, he released his debut album, Together as One, produced by No Doubt bassist Tony Kanal, and featuring contributions from Stefani, Tami Chynn, Sly & Robbie, and Cutty Ranks, which reached number seven on the Billboard Top Reggae Albums chart. Elan recently reunited with The Wailers as the lead singer and is touring the world singing the Wailers’ classics as well as songs from his Together as One album. Atias’ new project in 2010 had him singing lead vocals for Zadik, a reggae band that incorporates traditional Jewish prayers.

ELAN on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “ECHO”:

Echo, also known as Marshalls Cross Roads, is an unincorporated community in Dale County, Alabama, United States. Echo is located on Alabama State Route 27, 10.4 miles (16.7 km) east of Ozark.

Traditional explanation holds the community was named when early settlers were constructing a log cabin and heard an echo as two logs hit each other. A post office operated under the name Echo from 1851 to 1904.

Company B (known as “The Dale County Grays”) of the 33rd Regiment Alabama Infantry was partially made up of men from Echo. A portion of the 15th Regiment Alabama Infantry also came from Echo.

Echo was listed on the 1880 U.S. Census as an unincorporated community with a population of 123.

ECHO on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “PEP”:

The Packetized Ensemble Protocol (PEP) is a protocol used by Telebit modems. It uses the full bandwidth (3000 Hz) of the telephone lines and dividing it in hundreds of channels. The modem only chooses the channels that are error free, which makes PEP usable on bad lines. The disadvantage is the relatively long time it takes to switch between sending and receiving data. PEP was able to achieve half-duplex speeds of up to 18,000bit/s, with TurboPEP upping this to 23,000bit/s with the Worldblazer model.

PEP on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “HOP”:

Hop is a 2011 American 3D Easter-themed live-action/computer-animated family comedy film from Universal Pictures and Illumination Entertainment, directed by Tim Hill and produced by Chris Meledandri and Michele Imperato Stabile. The film was released on April 1, 2011, in the United States and the United Kingdom.

Hop stars the voice of Russell Brand as E.B., the Easter Bunny (Hugh Laurie)’s son who’d rather drum in a band than be like his father; James Marsden as Fred O’Hare, a human who is out of work and wishes to become the next Easter Bunny himself; and the voice of Hank Azaria as Carlos, an evil chick who plots to take over the Easter organization.

It was released on DVD and Blu-ray Disc on March 23, 2012, in Region 1.


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On Easter Island, a young rabbit named E.B. is intended to succeed his father as the Easter Bunny. Intimidated by the calling’s demands and ignoring his father’s orders, E.B. runs away to Hollywood to pursue his dream of becoming a drummer. So his father sends the Pink Berets out to find him. Meanwhile, Carlos the Chick plots a coup d’état against him to take over Easter.

HOP on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “DASH”:

A helmet-mounted display (HMD) is a device used in some modern aircraft, especially combat aircraft. HMDs project information similar to that of head-up displays (HUD) on an aircrew’s visor or reticle, thereby allowing them to obtain situation awareness and/or cue weapons systems to the direction his head is pointing. Applications which allow cuing of weapon systems are referred to as helmet-mounted sight and display (HMSD) or helmet-mounted sights (HMS). These devices were created first by South Africa, then the Soviet Union and followed by the United States.

Aviation HMD designs serve these purposes:

HMD systems, combined with High Off-Boresight (HOBS) weapons, results in the ability for aircrew to attack and destroy nearly any target seen by the pilot. These systems allow targets to be designated with minimal aircraft maneuvering, minimizing the time spent in the threat environment, and allowing greater lethality, survivability, and pilot situational awareness.

In 1962, Hughes Aircraft Company revealed the Electrocular, a compact CRT, head-mounted monocular display that reflected a TV signal onto a transparent eyepiece.

DASH on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “FIRE”:

The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) is a non-profit group founded in 1999 that focuses on civil liberties in academia in the United States. Its goal is “to defend and sustain individual rights at America’s colleges and universities,” including the rights to “freedom of speech, legal equality, due process, religious liberty, and sanctity of conscience”.

One of FIRE’s main activities has been criticism of university administrators whose activities have, in FIRE’s view, violated the free speech or due process rights of college and university students and professors under the First Amendment and/or Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution. FIRE lists over 170 such instances on its website.

FIRE was founded by Alan Charles Kors, a libertarian professor at the University of Pennsylvania, and Harvey A. Silverglate, a civil-liberties lawyer in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Silverglate remains the chairman of FIRE’s board, while Kors is Chairman Emeritus. Since March 23, 2006, FIRE’s President has been Greg Lukianoff, who previously served as interim president.

FIRE on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “BOOT”:

Political risk is a type of risk faced by investors, corporations, and governments that political decisions, events, or conditions will significantly affect the profitability of a business actor or the expected value of a given economic action. Political risk can be understood and managed with reasoned foresight and investment.

The term political risk has had many different meanings over time. Broadly speaking, however, political risk refers to the complications businesses and governments may face as a result of what are commonly referred to as political decisions—or “any political change that alters the expected outcome and value of a given economic action by changing the probability of achieving business objectives”. Political risk faced by firms can be defined as “the risk of a strategic, financial, or personnel loss for a firm because of such nonmarket factors as macroeconomic and social policies (fiscal, monetary, trade, investment, industrial, income, labour, and developmental), or events related to political instability (terrorism, riots, coups, civil war, and insurrection).” Portfolio investors may face similar financial losses. Moreover, governments may face complications in their ability to execute diplomatic, military or other initiatives as a result of political risk.

BOOT on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “DAP”:

Diaminopimelic acid (DAP) is an amino acid, representing an epsilon-carboxy derivative of lysine.

DAP is a characteristic of certain cell walls of some bacteria. DAP is often found in the peptide linkages of NAM-NAG chains that make up the cell wall of gram-negative bacteria. When provided, they exhibit normal growth. When in deficiency, they still grow but with the inability to make new cell wall proteoglycan.

This is also the attachment point for Braun’s lipoprotein.

DAP on Wikipedia