Break in the action

This time we are looking on the crossword clue for: Break in the action.
it’s A 19 letters crossword puzzle definition. See the possibilities below.

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Possible Answers: STOP, LULL, PAUSE, HIATUS, CEASEFIRE.

Last seen on: –USA Today Crossword – Mar 16 2020
Newsday.com Crossword – Mar 17 2019
The Washington Post Crossword – Nov 12 2018
LA Times Crossword 12 Nov 18, Monday

Random information on the term “STOP”:

In music, a double stop refers to the technique of playing two notes simultaneously on a bowed stringed instrument such as a violin, a viola, a cello, or a double bass. In performing a double stop, two separate strings are bowed or plucked simultaneously. Although the term itself suggests these strings are to be fingered (stopped), in practice one or both strings may be open.

A triple stop is the same technique applied to three strings; a quadruple stop applies to four strings. Double, triple, and quadruple stopping are collectively known as multiple stopping.

Early extensive examples of the double-stop and string chords appear in Carlo Farina’s Capriccio Stravagante from 1627, and in certain of the sonatas of Biagio Marini’s op. 8 of 1629.

On instruments with a curved bridge, it is difficult to bow more than two strings simultaneously. Early treatises make it clear that composers did not expect three notes to be played at once, even though the notes may be written in a way as to suggest this. Playing four notes at once is almost impossible. The normal way of playing three or four note chords is to sound the lower notes briefly and allow them to ring while the bow plays the upper notes (a broken chord). This gives the illusion of a true triple or quadruple stop. In forte, however, it is possible to play three notes at once, especially when bowed toward the fingerboard. With this technique more pressure than usual is needed on the bow, so this cannot be practiced in softer passages. This technique is mainly used in music with great force, such as the cadenza-like solo at the beginning of the last movement of Tchaikovsky’s violin concerto.

STOP on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “PAUSE”:

The Break key of a computer keyboard refers to breaking a telegraph circuit, and originated with 19th century practice. In modern usage, the key has no well-defined purpose, but while this is the case it can be used by software for miscellaneous tasks, such as to switch between multiple login sessions, to terminate a program, or to interrupt a modem connection.

Because the break function is usually combined with the pause function on one key since the introduction of the IBM Model M 101-key keyboard in 1985, the Break key is also called the Pause key. It can be used to pause some computer games.

A standard telegraph circuit connects all the keys, sounders and batteries in a single series loop. Thus the sounders actuate only when both keys are down (closed, also known as “marking” — after the ink marks made on paper tape by early printing telegraphs). So the receiving operator has to hold their key down, or close a built-in shorting switch, in order to let the other operator send. As a consequence the receiving operator could interrupt the sending operator by opening their key, breaking the circuit and forcing it into a “spacing” condition. Both sounders stop responding to the sender’s keying, alerting the sender. (A physical break in the telegraph line would have the same effect.)

PAUSE on Wikipedia