Comprehensive

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Possible Answers: MACRO, FAR, TOTAL, ATOZ, WIDE, GLOBAL, OVERALL, GENERIC, INDEPTH, ALLINONE, SOUPTONUTS, CATHOLIC, STEMTOSTERN, SWEEPING, FULLSCOPE.

Last seen on: –Wall Street Journal Crossword – Jan 15 2019 – Understand?

Random information on the term “MACRO”:

The macroscopic scale is the length scale on which objects or phenomena are large enough to be visible almost practically with the naked eye, without magnifying optical instruments.

When applied to physical phenomena and bodies, the macroscopic scale describes things as a person can directly perceive them, without the aid of magnifying devices. This is in contrast to observations (microscopy) or theories (microphysics, statistical physics) of objects of geometric lengths smaller than perhaps some hundreds of micrometers.

A macroscopic view of a ball is just that: a ball. A microscopic view could reveal a thick round skin seemingly composed entirely of puckered cracks and fissures (as viewed through a microscope) or, further down in scale, a collection of molecules in a roughly spherical shape. An example of a physical theory that takes a deliberately macroscopic viewpoint is thermodynamics. An example of a topic that extends from macroscopic to microscopic viewpoints is histology.

MACRO on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “FAR”:

The Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) is the principal set of rules in the Federal Acquisition Regulations System. The FAR System governs the “acquisition process” by which executive agencies of the United States federal government acquire (i.e., purchase or lease) goods and services by contract with appropriated funds. The process consists of three phases:

The FAR System regulates the activities of government personnel in carrying out that process. The FAR System is codified at Title 48, Chapter 1 of the Code of Federal Regulations. These requirements can be found in the Code of Federal Regulations at 48 C.F.R. 31.

While nearly all federal government executive agencies are required to comply with the FAR, some executive agencies are exempt (e.g., the Federal Aviation Administration and the U.S. Mint). In those cases, the agency promulgates its own specific procurement rules. The remainder of the FAR System consists mostly of sets of regulations issued by executive agencies of the federal government of the United States to supplement the FAR.

FAR on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “TOTAL”:

In mathematics, a partial function from X to Y (written as f: X ↛ Y) is a function f: X ′ → Y, for some subset X ′ of X. It generalizes the concept of a function f: X → Y by not forcing f to map every element of X to an element of Y (only some subset X ′ of X). If X ′ = X, then f is called a total function and is equivalent to a function. Partial functions are often used when the exact domain, X, is not known (e.g. many functions in computability theory).

Specifically, we will say that for any x ∈ X, either:

For example, we can consider the square root function restricted to the integers

Thus g(n) is only defined for n that are perfect squares (i.e., 0, 1, 4, 9, 16, …). So, g(25) = 5, but g(26) is undefined.


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There are two distinct meanings in current mathematical usage for the notion of the domain of a partial function. Most mathematicians, including recursion theorists, use the term “domain of f” for the set of all values x such that f(x) is defined (X’ above). But some, particularly category theorists, consider the domain of a partial function f:X → Y to be X, and refer to X’ as the domain of definition. Similarly, the term range can refer to either the codomain or the image of a function.

TOTAL on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “WIDE”:

In the sport of cricket, a wide is one of two things:

A wide does not count as one of the six balls in an over and it does not count as a ball faced by the batsman.

When a wide is bowled, one run is added to the runs scored off that ball, and is scored as extras and are added to the team’s total, but are not added to any batsman’s total.

A batsman cannot, by definition, be out bowled, leg before wicket, caught, or hit the ball twice off a wide, as a ball cannot be ruled as a wide if the ball strikes the batsman’s bat or person. He may be out handled the ball, hit wicket, obstructing the field, run out, or stumped.

If the wicket-keeper fumbles or misses the ball, the batsmen may be able to take additional runs safely, and may choose to do so. The number of runs scored are scored as wides, not byes. These extra wides are all added to the bowler’s score.

If the wicket-keeper misses the ball and it travels all the way to the boundary, the batting team immediately scores five wides, similarly as if the ball had been hit to the boundary for a four on a no ball. If a wide ball crosses the boundary without touching the ground, only five wides (not seven) are scored – according to Law 19.5, a boundary six can only be scored if the ball has touched the bat.

WIDE on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “GLOBAL”:

This category has the following 4 subcategories, out of 4 total.

The following 118 pages are in this category, out of 118 total. This list may not reflect recent changes (learn more).

GLOBAL on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “GENERIC”:

Trademark distinctiveness is an important concept in the law governing trademarks and service marks. A trademark may be eligible for registration, or registrable, if it performs the essential trademark function, and has distinctive character. Registrability can be understood as a continuum, with “inherently distinctive” marks at one end, “generic” and “descriptive” marks with no distinctive character at the other end, and “suggestive” and “arbitrary” marks lying between these two points. “Descriptive” marks must acquire distinctiveness through secondary meaning – consumers have come to recognize the mark as a source indicator – to be protectable. “Generic” terms are used to refer to the product or service itself and cannot be used as trademarks.

In United States trademark law, Abercrombie & Fitch Co. v. Hunting World 537 F.2d 4 (2nd Cir. 1976) established the spectrum of trademark distinctiveness in the US, breaking trademarks into classes which are accorded differing degrees of protection. Courts often speak of marks falling along the following “spectrum of distinctiveness,” also known within the US as the “Abercrombie classification” or “Abercrombie factors”:

GENERIC on Wikipedia