Dodge

This time we are looking on the crossword clue for: Dodge.
it’s A 5 letters crossword puzzle definition. See the possibilities below.

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Possible Answers: AVOID, EVADE, ELUDE, RUSE, AVERT, SHUN, SHIRK, PARRY, SIDESTEP, EVASION, DUCK.

Last seen on: –L.A. Times Daily Crossword – Sep 25 2022
Universal Crossword – Aug 11 2022 s
Wall Street Journal Crossword – July 10 2022 – How Ironic!
Wall Street Journal Crossword – July 09 2022 – How Ironic!
USA Today Crossword – Mar 21 2022
USA Today Crossword – Dec 23 2021
Wall Street Journal Crossword – December 13 2021 – Up for Grabs
LA Times Crossword 5 Aug 21, Thursday
LA Times Crossword 8 May 21, Saturday
The Sun – Two Speed Crossword – Jan 2 2021
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Dec 30 2020
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Nov 14 2020
NY Times Crossword 9 May 20, Saturday
The Washington Post Crossword – Apr 28 2020
LA Times Crossword 28 Apr 20, Tuesday
Jonesin’ – Feb 18 2020
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jan 27 2020
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jan 2 2020
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jun 1 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Oct 22 2018
LA Times Crossword 16 Aug 2018, Thursday
-Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Nov 25 2017

Random information on the term “RUSE”:

This category lists video games first published in 2010.

The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 807 total. This list may not reflect recent changes (learn more).

RUSE on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “AVERT”:

This category has only the following subcategory.

The following 98 pages are in this category, out of 98 total. This list may not reflect recent changes (learn more).

AVERT on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “PARRY”:

The history of natural language processing describes the advances of natural language processing (Outline of natural language processing). There is some overlap with the history of machine translation and the history of artificial intelligence.

The history of machine translation dates back to the seventeenth century, when philosophers such as Leibniz and Descartes put forward proposals for codes which would relate words between languages. All of these proposals remained theoretical, and none resulted in the development of an actual machine.

The first patents for “translating machines” were applied for in the mid-1930s. One proposal, by Georges Artsrouni was simply an automatic bilingual dictionary using paper tape. The other proposal, by Peter Troyanskii, a Russian, was more detailed. It included both the bilingual dictionary, and a method for dealing with grammatical roles between languages, based on Esperanto.

In 1950, Alan Turing published his famous article “Computing Machinery and Intelligence” which proposed what is now called the Turing test as a criterion of intelligence. This criterion depends on the ability of a computer program to impersonate a human in a real-time written conversation with a human judge, sufficiently well that the judge is unable to distinguish reliably — on the basis of the conversational content alone — between the program and a real human.

PARRY on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “DUCK”:

The duckwalk is an unusual form of locomotion performed by assuming a low partial squatting position and walking forwards, maintaining the low stance. It is similar to stalking and prowling. It is most widely known as a stage element of guitar showmanship popularized by rock ‘n’ roll star Chuck Berry. It is also a physical exercise commonly used in military training.

The term “duckwalk” is also loosely used to describe Chuck Berry’s other guitar playing stunt, his one-legged hop routine with the other leg waving in the air.

While the origins of the duckwalk have been traced as far back as T-Bone Walker who already during the 1930s performed dance moves while playing his guitar, it was Chuck Berry who made the duckwalk popular and who is often credited as the inventor. He first used it as a child when he walked “stooping with full-bended knees, but with my back and head vertical” under a table to retrieve a ball and his family found it entertaining; he used it when “performing in New York for the first time and some journalist branded it the duck walk.”

DUCK on Wikipedia