Film theatre

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Possible Answers: CINEMA.

Last seen on: –Irish Times Simplex – Feb 22 2020
The Sun – Two Speed Crossword – Sep 9 2019
The Sun – Two Speed Crossword – Jul 9 2019
Irish Times Simplex Crossword – Oct 10 2018
Irish Times Simplex Crossword – Aug 7 2017

Random information on the term “Film theatre”:

IMAX is a 70 mm motion picture film format and a set of cinema projection standards developed in Canada in the late 1960s and early 1970s by Graeme Ferguson, Roman Kroitor, Robert Kerr, and William C. Shaw. IMAX has the capacity to record and display images of far greater size and resolution (detail) than conventional film systems. Unlike conventional projectors, the film is run horizontally (see diagram sprocket holes) so that the image width is greater than the width of the film. Since 2002, some feature films have been converted (or upgraded) into IMAX format for displaying in IMAX theatres and some have also been partially shot in IMAX. IMAX is the most widely used system for special-venue film presentations. As of June 2017, there were 1,257 IMAX theatres in 75 countries.


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The desire to increase the visual impact of film has a long history. In 1929, Fox introduced Fox Grandeur, the first 70 mm film format, but it quickly fell from use. In the 1950s, the potential of 35 mm film to provide wider projected images was explored in the processes of CinemaScope (1953) and VistaVision (1954), following multi-projector systems such as Cinerama (1952). While impressive, Cinerama was difficult to install. During Expo 67 in Montreal, the National Film Board of Canada’s In the Labyrinth and Ferguson’s Man and the Polar Regions both used multi-projector, multi-screen systems. Each encountered technical difficulties that led them to found a company called “Multiscreen”, with a goal of developing a simpler approach. The single-projector/single-camera system they eventually settled upon was designed and built by Shaw based upon a novel “Rolling Loop” film-transport technology purchased from Peter Ronald Wright Jones, a machine shop worker from Brisbane, Australia (see U.S. Patent 3,494,524). As it became clear that a single, large-screen image had more impact than multiple smaller ones and was a more viable product direction, Multiscreen changed its name to IMAX. An IMAX 3D theatre also is in operation near the former Expo 67 site at the Montreal Science Centre in the Port of Old Montreal.

Film theatre on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “CINEMA”:

Cinematography is the science or art of motion-picture photography by recording light or other electromagnetic radiation, either electronically by means of an image sensor, or chemically by means of a light-sensitive material such as film stock.

Typically, a lens is used to repeatedly focus the light reflected from objects into real images on the light-sensitive surface inside a camera during a questioned exposure, creating multiple images. With an electronic image sensor, this produces an electrical charge at each pixel, which is electronically processed and stored in a video file for subsequent display or processing. The result with photographic emulsion is a series of invisible latent images on the film stock, which are later chemically “developed” into a visible image. The images on the film stock are played back at a rapid speed and projected onto a screen, creating the illusion of motion.

Cinematography finds uses in many fields of science and business as well as for entertainment purposes and mass communication.

CINEMA on Wikipedia