Future ___ (what the verb form will go is)

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Tense.

Last seen on: Daily Celebrity Crossword – 2/16/19 Sports Fan Friday


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Random information on the term “Tense”:

In grammar, tense is a category that expresses time reference with reference to the moment of speaking.[2][3] Tenses are usually manifested by the use of specific forms of verbs, particularly in their conjugation patterns.

Main tenses found in many languages include the past, present, and future. Some languages have only two distinct tenses, such as past and nonpast, or future and nonfuture. There are also tenseless languages, like most of the Chinese languages, though it can possess a future and nonfuture system, which is typical of Sino-Tibetan languages.[4] On the other hand, some languages make finer tense distinctions, such as remote vs recent past, or near vs remote future.

Tenses generally express time relative to the moment of speaking. In some contexts, however, their meaning may be relativized to a point in the past or future which is established in the discourse (the moment being spoken about). This is called relative (as opposed to absolute) tense. Some languages have different verb forms or constructions which manifest relative tense, such as pluperfect (“past-in-the-past”) and “future-in-the-past”.

Tense on Wikipedia