Hurry

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Possible Answers: TROT, TEAR, RACE, HIE, RUN, HASTE, DASH, SPEED, RUSH, ZIP, HASTEN, STEPONIT, HUSTLE, MAKETRACKS, BUSTLE, SHAKEALEG, STEPONTHEGAS, GETAMOVEON, HIGHTAILIT, HOTFOOTIT, LOSENOTIME, MAKEHASTE, GOSWIFTLY.

Last seen on: –Newsday.com Crossword – Apr 9 2019
Canadiana Crossword – Apr 1 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Sep 13 2018
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jul 11 2018
-The Washington Post Crossword – May 25 2018
-LA Times Crossword 25 May 2018, Friday

Random information on the term “RACE”:

In biological taxonomy, race is an informal rank in the taxonomic hierarchy, below the level of subspecies. It has been used as a higher rank than strain, with several strains making up one race. Various definitions exist. Races may be genetically distinct phenotypic populations of interbreeding individuals within the same species, or they may be defined in other ways, e.g. geographically, or physiologically. Genetic isolation between races is not complete, but genetic differences may have accumulated that are not (yet) sufficient to separate species.

In botany, the Latin words stirps and proles were traditionally used, and proles was recommended in the first botanical Code of Nomenclature, published in 1868.

Races are defined according to any identifiable characteristic, including gene frequencies. “Race differences are relative, not absolute”. Adaptive differences that distinguish races can accumulate even with substantial gene flow and clinal (rather than discrete) habitat variation.

RACE on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “HIE”:

The grammar of Old English is quite different from that of Modern English, predominantly by being much more inflected. As an old Germanic language, Old English has a morphological system that is similar to that of the hypothetical Proto-Germanic reconstruction, retaining many of the inflections thought to have been common in Proto-Indo-European and also including characteristically Germanic constructions such as the umlaut.

Among living languages, Old English morphology most closely resembles that of modern Icelandic, which is among the most conservative of the Germanic languages; to a lesser extent, the Old English inflectional system is similar to that of modern German.

Nouns, pronouns, adjectives and determiners were fully inflected with five grammatical cases (nominative, accusative, genitive, dative, and instrumental), two grammatical numbers (singular and plural) and three grammatical genders (masculine, feminine, and neuter). First- and second-person personal pronouns also had dual forms for referring to groups of two people, in addition to the usual singular and plural forms. The instrumental case was somewhat rare and occurred only in the masculine and neuter singular. It was often replaced by the dative. Adjectives, pronouns and (sometimes) participles agreed with their antecedent nouns in case, number and gender. Finite verbs agreed with their subject in person and number.

HIE on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “RUN”:

Running is a method of terrestrial locomotion allowing humans and other animals to move rapidly on foot. Running is a type of gait characterized by an aerial phase in which all feet are above the ground (though there are exceptions). This is in contrast to walking, where one foot is always in contact with the ground, the legs are kept mostly straight and the center of gravity vaults over the stance leg or legs in an inverted pendulum fashion. A characteristic feature of a running body from the viewpoint of spring-mass mechanics is that changes in kinetic and potential energy within a stride occur simultaneously, with energy storage accomplished by springy tendons and passive muscle elasticity. The term running can refer to any of a variety of speeds ranging from jogging to sprinting.

It is assumed that the ancestors of mankind developed the ability to run for long distances about 2.6 million years ago, probably in order to hunt animals. Competitive running grew out of religious festivals in various areas. Records of competitive racing date back to the Tailteann Games in Ireland in 1829 BCE,[citation needed] while the first recorded Olympic Games took place in 776 BCE. Running has been described as the world’s most accessible sport.

RUN on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “HASTE”:

Haste is a municipality in the district of Schaumburg, in Lower Saxony, Germany.


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HASTE on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “DASH”:

A helmet-mounted display (HMD) is a device used in some modern aircraft, especially combat aircraft. HMDs project information similar to that of head-up displays (HUD) on an aircrew’s visor or reticle, thereby allowing them to obtain situation awareness and/or cue weapons systems to the direction his head is pointing. Applications which allow cuing of weapon systems are referred to as helmet-mounted sight and display (HMSD) or helmet-mounted sights (HMS). These devices were created first by South Africa, then the Soviet Union and followed by the United States.

Aviation HMD designs serve these purposes:

HMD systems, combined with High Off-Boresight (HOBS) weapons, results in the ability for aircrew to attack and destroy nearly any target seen by the pilot. These systems allow targets to be designated with minimal aircraft maneuvering, minimizing the time spent in the threat environment, and allowing greater lethality, survivability, and pilot situational awareness.

In 1962, Hughes Aircraft Company revealed the Electrocular, a compact CRT, head-mounted monocular display that reflected a TV signal onto a transparent eyepiece.

DASH on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “SPEED”:

Speed, as a name, may refer to:

SPEED on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “RUSH”:

In psychology, a rush is an acute transcendent state of euphoria. Psychoactive drugs which enhance dopaminergic neurotransmission in the central nervous system (CNS) are commonly capable of such an event.

These drugs include opiates and opioids, such as heroin and morphine, and psychostimulants, such as methamphetamine and cocaine. Studies have shown that the subjective pleasure of drug use (the reinforcing component of addiction) is proportional to the rate at which the blood level of the drug increases. Intravenous injection is the fastest route of administration, causing blood concentrations to rise the most quickly, followed by smoking, suppository (anal or vaginal insertion), insufflation (snorting), and ingestion (swallowing).

RUSH on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “ZIP”:

A zipper, zip, fly, or zip fastener, formerly known as a clasp locker, is a commonly used device for binding the edges of an opening of fabric or other flexible material, like on a garment or a bag. It is used in clothing (e.g., jackets and jeans), luggage and other bags, sporting goods, camping gear (e.g. tents and sleeping bags), and other items. Whitcomb L. Judson was an American inventor from Chicago who invented and constructed a workable zipper. The method, still in use today, is based on interlocking teeth. Initially it was called the “hookless fastener” and was later redesigned to become more reliable.

The bulk of a zipper/zip consists of two rows of protruding teeth, which may be made to interdigitate, linking the rows, carrying from tens to hundreds of specially shaped metal or plastic teeth. These teeth can be either individual or shaped from a continuous coil, and are also referred to as elements. The slider, operated by hand, moves along the rows of teeth. Inside the slider is a Y-shaped channel that meshes together or separates the opposing rows of teeth, depending on the direction of the slider’s movement. The word Zipper is onomatopoetic, because it was named for the sound the device makes when used, a high-pitched zip.

ZIP on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “HUSTLE”:

Katsumasa Kuroki (born January 9, 1973) is a Japanese professional wrestler, better known by his ring name Magnum TOKYO. Most closely associated with the now-defunct HUSTLE professional wrestling promotion, he also competed for World Championship Wrestling, Toryumon, and Dragon Gate as Tokyo Magnum and Magnum TOKYO.

Magnum TOKYO has become popular in Japan for both his high-flying junior-heavyweight style (a style common amongst students of Último Dragón) and his elaborate entrances, which have included dancing through the crowd and dance sequences in the ring with his own dance troupe. His gimmick is that of an adult entertainer, and he often wears eye-masks to the ring while carrying a pink umbrella. At one point in his career, some members of the crowd would actually stuff money into his tights.

Currently, Kuroki works as a Daido-juku Kudo trainer in Japan and Colombia.

Magnum Tokyo was a popular mainstay in Japan’s Dragon Gate promotion. He was trained by Último Dragón and graduated from Dragon’s “Toryumon Gym” in 1997, making his professional wrestling debut on May 11, 1997 by defeating fellow débutante Nobuhiko Oshima. After his first match he would become Magnum Tokyo and developed his character over the year. He would also make appearances for Consejo Mundial de Lucha Libre and International Wrestling Revolution Group. Magnum defeated Tony Rivera in the final of the Young Dragons Cup 1997. On July 5, he defeated El Hijo del Gladiador for the IWRG Intercontinental Middleweight Championship and held it for three months before losing it to Mr. Niebla.

HUSTLE on Wikipedia