Japanese capital

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Possible Answers: YEN, EDO, YEDO.

Last seen on: –Canadiana Crossword – Apr 8 2019

Random information on the term “YEN”:

₳ ​ ฿ ​ ₵ ​¢ ​₡ ​₢ ​ $ ​₫ ​₯ ​֏ ​ ₠ ​€ ​ ƒ ​₣ ​ ₲ ​ ₴ ​ ₭ ​ ₺ ​₾ ​ ℳ ​₥ ​ ₦ ​ ₧ ​₱ ​₰ ​£ ​ ៛ ​₽ ​₹ ₨ ​ ₪ ​ ৳ ​₸ ​₮ ​ ₩ ​ ¥

The Yen sign (¥) is a currency sign used by the Chinese yuan (CNY) and the Japanese yen (JPY) currencies. This monetary symbol resembles a Latin letter Y with a double stroke. The base unit of both currencies shared the same Chinese character/Kanji (traditional Chinese: 圓; simplified Chinese: 圆; Japanese Shinjitai: 円) that means “circle”. It is pronounced yuán in Mandarin Chinese and en in Standard Japanese. In mainland China, the Chinese character is more frequently written in everyday situations using the simpler character 元, which has the same pronunciation as the formal financial character 圓 in Mandarin (but not in Japanese and in some Chinese varieties). The symbol is usually placed before the value it represents, for example 20.

In the Japanese-language locales of Microsoft operating systems, the yen sign in code page 932 character encoding has the same byte value as the backslash in ASCII. It is also used wherever a backslash is used, such as the directory separator character and the general escape character, essentially making it a backslash with the appearance of a yen sign, a peculiarity that stems from JIS X 0201.


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YEN on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “EDO”:

The Edo period (江戸時代?, Edo jidai) or Tokugawa period (徳川時代?, Tokugawa jidai) is the period between 1603 and 1868 in the history of Japan, when Japanese society was under the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate and the country’s 300 regional daimyō. The period was characterized by economic growth, strict social order, isolationist foreign policies, a stable population, “no more wars”, and popular enjoyment of arts and culture. The shogunate was officially established in Edo on March 24, 1603, by Tokugawa Ieyasu. The period came to an end with the Meiji Restoration on May 3, 1868, after the fall of Edo.

A revolution took place from the time of the Kamakura shogunate, which existed with the Tenno’s court, to the Tokugawa, when the samurai became the unchallenged rulers in what historian Edwin O. Reischauer called a “centralized feudal” form of government. Instrumental in the rise of the new bakufu was Tokugawa Ieyasu, the main beneficiary of the achievements of Oda Nobunaga and Toyotomi Hideyoshi. Already powerful, Ieyasu profited by his transfer to the rich Kantō area. He maintained two million koku of land, a new headquarters at Edo, a strategically situated castle town (the future Tokyo), and also had an additional two million koku of land and thirty-eight vassals under his control. After Hideyoshi’s death, Ieyasu moved quickly to seize control from the Toyotomi family.

EDO on Wikipedia