Language suffix

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Possible Answers: ESE, ISH.

Last seen on: –Wall Street Journal Crossword – January 28 2020 – Smooth Sailing
LA Times Crossword 22 Jan 20, Wednesday
NY Times Crossword 10 Jan 20, Friday
LA Times Crossword 14 Oct 19, Monday
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Oct 5 2019
The Washington Post Crossword – Mar 10 2019
LA Times Crossword 10 Mar 19, Sunday
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jan 25 2019
Universal Crossword – Jan 17 2019
Universal Crossword – Jan 6 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Dec 10 2018
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Aug 10 2018
LA Times Crossword 18 Jul 2018, Wednesday
The Washington Post Crossword – July 18 2018
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jul 6 2018


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Random information on the term “ESE”:

The points of the compass, specifically on the compass rose, mark divisions of a compass; such divisions may be referred to as “winds” or “directions”. A compass point allows reference to a specific heading (or course or azimuth) in a general or colloquial fashion, without having to compute or remember degrees.

A compass is primarily divided into the four cardinal points—north, south, east, and west. These are often further subdivided by the addition of the four intercardinal (or ordinal) directions—northeast (NE) between north and east, southeast (SE), southwest (SW), and northwest (NW)—to indicate the eight principal winds. In meteorological usage, further intermediate points between cardinal and ordinal points, such as north-northeast (NNE) between north and northeast, are added to give the sixteen points of a wind compass. At the most complete division in European tradition, are the full thirty-two points of the mariner’s compass, which adds points such as north by east (NbE) between north and north-northeast, and northeast by north (NEbN) between north-northeast and northeast.

ESE on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “ISH”:

Ish Kabibble (January 19, 1908 – June 5, 1994) was an American comedian and cornet player. Born Merwyn Bogue in North East, Pennsylvania, he moved to Erie, Pennsylvania with his family a few months after his birth.

Bogue studied law at West Virginia University, but his comedy antics soon found an audience. He performed with Kay Kyser on the television quiz show Kay Kyser’s Kollege of Musical Knowledge in 1949 and 1950. Bogue also appeared in ten movies between 1939 and 1950. In Thousands Cheer (1943), he appeared with Kyser and sang “I Dug a Ditch”, and he also appeared as a vocalist in That’s Right You’re Wrong (1939), You’ll Find Out (1940), and Playmates (1941).

In his 1989 autobiography, Bogue explained his stage name, which he took from the lyrics of one of his comedic songs, “Isch ga-bibble.”

The song derived from a mock-Yiddish expression, “Ische ga bibble?”, which was purported to mean “I should worry?”, prompting a curious (and perhaps not coincidental) association with the “What, me worry?” motto of Mad Magazine’s mascot, Alfred E. Neuman.[citation needed] While this derivation has been widely quoted on the Internet and elsewhere, the expression “ische ga bibble” is not Yiddish and contains no Yiddish words at all. However, there is a Yiddish expression, “nisht gefidlt,” meaning “it doesn’t matter to me,” from which the term “ish kabibble” may derive.

ISH on Wikipedia