Little rascal

This time we are looking on the crossword clue for: Little rascal.
it’s A 13 letters crossword puzzle definition. See the possibilities below.

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Possible Answers: ELF, IMP, SCAMP, ALFALFA, URCHIN, RUGRAT.

Last seen on: –Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Nov 15 2022
Wall Street Journal Crossword – November 02 2022 – Chart a Course
L.A. Times Daily Crossword – Sep 25 2022
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Sep 21 2022
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Aug 15 2022
L.A. Times Daily Crossword – Jul 17 2022
NY Times Crossword 6 Jun 22, Monday
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – May 6 2022
Wall Street Journal Crossword – March 09 2022 – Sinking Funds
LA Times Crossword 5 Aug 21, Thursday
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Apr 26 2021
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Apr 19 2021
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Mar 17 2021
The Washington Post Crossword – Feb 3 2021
LA Times Crossword 3 Feb 21, Wednesday
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jan 30 2021
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Dec 24 2020
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Dec 4 2020
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Nov 19 2020
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Oct 23 2020
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Sep 28 2020
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Sep 4 2020
Universal Crossword – Jun 24 2020
The Washington Post Crossword – Apr 4 2020
LA Times Crossword 4 Apr 20, Saturday
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Mar 26 2020
NY Times Crossword 16 Mar 20, Monday
USA Today Crossword – Feb 28 2020
Wall Street Journal Crossword – February 10 2020 – Blown Away
USA Today Crossword – Jan 16 2020
LA Times Crossword 10 Dec 19, Tuesday
Wall Street Journal Crossword – October 14 2019 – Food for Afterthought
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jun 24 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jun 5 2019
The Washington Post Crossword – Apr 23 2019
LA Times Crossword 23 Apr 19, Tuesday
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Mar 9 2019
Premier Sunday – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jan 13 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Dec 14 2018
Wall Street Journal Crossword – Nov 24 2018 – Comparatively Speaking
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Nov 17 2018
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Oct 19 2018
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Sep 18 2018
Daily Celebrity Crossword – 6/12/18 TV Tuesday
-Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jun 11 2018

Random information on the term “ELF”:

In computing, the Executable and Linkable Format (ELF, formerly named Extensible Linking Format), is a common standard file format for executable files, object code, shared libraries, and core dumps. First published in the specification for the application binary interface (ABI) of the Unix operating system version named System V Release 4 (SVR4), and later in the Tool Interface Standard, it was quickly accepted among different vendors of Unix systems. In 1999, it was chosen as the standard binary file format for Unix and Unix-like systems on x86 processors by the 86open project.

By design, ELF is flexible, extensible, and cross-platform, not bound to any given central processing unit (CPU) or instruction set architecture. This has allowed it to be adopted by many different operating systems on many different hardware platforms.

Each ELF file is made up of one ELF header, followed by file data. The data can include:

The segments contain information that is needed for run time execution of the file, while sections contain important data for linking and relocation. Any byte in the entire file can be owned by one section at most, and orphan bytes can occur which are unowned by any section.

ELF on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “IMP”:

The Interactive Mathematics Program (IMP) is a four-year, problem-based mathematics curriculum for high schools. It was one of several curricula funded by the National Science Foundation and designed around the 1989 National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) standards. The IMP books were authored by Dan Fendel and Diane Resek, professors of mathematics at San Francisco State University, and by Lynne Alper and Sherry Fraser. IMP was published by Key Curriculum Press in 1997 and sold in 2012 to It’s About Time.

Designed in response to national reports pointing to the need for a major overhaul in mathematics education, the IMP curriculum is markedly different in structure, content, and pedagogy from courses more typically found in the high school sequence.

Nearly every one of these distinctive characteristics has generated controversy and placed the IMP curriculum right in the middle of the “math wars,” the conflict between those that favor more traditional curricula in mathematics education and the supporters of the reform curricula that were largely an outgrowth of the 1989 NCTM standards.

IMP on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “SCAMP”:

Scamp is a Disney canine cartoon and comics character, the son of Lady and the Tramp, appearing in the animated movies Lady and the Tramp and Lady and the Tramp II: Scamp’s Adventure, as well as in comic strips and books of his own since the 1950s.

The first daily strip featuring Scamp as the main character was published on October 31, 1955, written by Ward Greene and drawn by Dick Moores. The final Scamp comic strip was on June 19, 1988.

The Scamp character first appeared in comic book form was in Four Color #703 written by Del Connell, drawn by Al Hubbard and published by Dell Comics, after making three more appearance in Four Color the Scamp strip was given its own ongoing title starting its numbering with issue #5 after taking its numbering from the first four appearances in Four Color lasting till issue 15. The second series published by Gold Key Comics ran for 45 issues. The comic book was published in 1958-1961 and then again in 1967-1979 .

An unnamed puppy appeared in the first Lady and the Tramp that was used as the basis for the comics character. Scamp was adapted into the movie Lady and the Tramp II: Scamp’s Adventure, with Scamp serving as its main character, and his siblings appearing in small roles.

SCAMP on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “ALFALFA”:

This category has the following 11 subcategories, out of 11 total.

The following 98 pages are in this category, out of 98 total. This list may not reflect recent changes (learn more).

ALFALFA on Wikipedia