Loath to leave chocolatier – a master of Latin prose

Now we are looking on the crossword clue for: Loath to leave chocolatier – a master of Latin prose.
it’s A 52 letters crossword puzzle definition.
Next time, try using the search term “Loath to leave chocolatier – a master of Latin prose crossword” or “Loath to leave chocolatier – a master of Latin prose crossword clue” when searching for help with your puzzle on the web. See the possible answers for Loath to leave chocolatier – a master of Latin prose below.

Did you find what you needed?
We hope you did!. If you are still unsure with some definitions, don’t hesitate to search them here with our crossword puzzle solver.

Possible Answers:

CICERO.

Last seen on: Irish Times Crosaire – Mar 12 2019

Random information on the term “CICERO”:

Cicero (originally known as Hawthorne) is a suburb of Chicago and an incorporated town in Cook County, Illinois, United States. The population was 83,891 at the 2010 census.[6] As of 2013, the town had a total population of 84,103,[7] making it the 11th largest municipality in Illinois. The town of Cicero is named after Marcus Tullius Cicero, the Roman statesman and orator.


New Crossword clues and help App now available in the App Store and Google Play Store!
Crossword clues app Android Crossword clues app iphone iOs

Originally, Cicero Township occupied six times its current territory. Weak political leadership and town services resulted in cities such as Oak Park and Berwyn voting to split off from Cicero, and other portions such as Austin were annexed into the city of Chicago.[8]

By 1911, an aerodrome called the Cicero Flying Field had been established as the town’s first aircraft facility of any type,[9] located on a roughly square plot of land about 800 meters (1/2-mile) per side, on then-open ground at 41°51′19.03″N 87°44′56.5″W / 41.8552861°N 87.749028°W / 41.8552861; -87.749028 by the Aero Club of Illinois, founded on February 10, 1910.[10] Famous pilots like Hans-Joachim Buddecke, Lincoln Beachey, Chance M. Vought and others flew from there at various times during the “pioneer era” of aviation in the United States shortly before the nation’s involvement in World War I, before the field closed in mid-April 1916.[11]

CICERO on Wikipedia