Lowly worker

This time we are looking on the crossword clue for: Lowly worker.
it’s A 12 letters crossword puzzle definition. See the possibilities below.

Did you find what you needed?
We hope you did!. If you are still unsure with some definitions, don’t hesitate to search them here with our crossword solver.

Possible Answers: ANT, PEON, SERF, COG, MENIAL, VASSAL, DRUDGE, COOLIE.

Last seen on: –USA Today Crossword – Feb 24 2020
Premier Sunday – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Feb 9 2020
NY Times Crossword 9 Feb 20, Sunday
Daily Celebrity Crossword – 11/26/19 TV Tuesday
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Aug 17 2019
The Washington Post Crossword – May 6 2019
LA Times Crossword 6 May 19, Monday
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Feb 12 2019

Random information on the term “ANT”:

Actor–network theory (ANT) is an approach to social theory and a research methodology, originating in the field of science studies, which is based on two key principles; putting all the factors involved in a social situation on the same level and doing away with the concept of social forces. Thus, objects, ideas, processes, and any other relevant factors are seen as just as important in creating social situations as humans. ANT holds that social forces do not exist in themselves, and therefore cannot be used to explain social phenomena. Instead, strictly empirical analysis should be undertaken to “describe” rather than “explain” social activity. Only after this can one introduce the concept of social forces, and only as an abstract theoretical concept, not something which genuinely exists in the world. The fundamental aim of ANT is to explore how networks are built or assembled and maintained to achieve a specific objective. Although it is best known for its controversial insistence on the capacity of nonhumans to act or participate in systems or networks or both, ANT is also associated with forceful critiques of conventional and critical sociology. Developed by science and technology studies (STS) scholars Michel Callon and Bruno Latour, the sociologist John Law, and others, it can more technically be described as a “material-semiotic” method. This means that it maps relations that are simultaneously material (between things) and semiotic (between concepts). It assumes that many relations are both material and semiotic.


New Crossword clues and help App now available in the App Store and Google Play Store!
Crossword clues app Android Crossword clues app iphone iOs

ANT on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “SERF”:

This category is about inventions that were patented though not necessarily invented in the United States.

This category has the following 13 subcategories, out of 13 total.

The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 610 total. This list may not reflect recent changes (learn more).

SERF on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “COG”:

A cog (or cog-built vessels) is a type of ship that first appeared in the 10th century, and was widely used from around the 12th century on. Cogs were generally built of oak, which was an abundant timber in the Baltic region of Prussia. This vessel was fitted with a single mast and a square-rigged single sail. These vessels were mostly associated with seagoing trade in medieval Europe, especially the Hanseatic League, particularly in the Baltic Sea region. They ranged from about 15 meters to 25 meters in length (49 ft to 82 ft) with a beam of 5 to 8 meters (16 ft to 26 ft), and the largest cog ships could carry up to about 200 tons.

Cogs were a type of round ship, characterized by a flush-laid flat bottom at midships but gradually shifted to overlapped strakes near the posts. They had full lapstrake planking covering the sides, generally starting from the bilge strakes, and double-clenched iron nails for plank fastenings. The keel, or keelplank, was only slightly thicker than the adjacent garboards and had no rabbet. Both stem and stern posts were straight and rather long, and connected to the keelplank through intermediate pieces called hooks. The lower plank hoods terminated in rabbets in the hooks and posts, but upper hoods were nailed to the exterior faces of the posts. Caulking was generally tarred moss that was inserted into curved grooves, covered with wooden laths, and secured by metal staples called sintels. Finally, the cog-built structure could not be completed without a stern-mounted hanging central rudder, which was a unique northern development. Cogs used to have open hulls and could be rowed short distances. In the 13th century they received decks.

COG on Wikipedia