Parody

This time we are looking on the crossword clue for: Parody.
it’s A 6 letters crossword puzzle definition. See the possibilities below.

Did you find what you needed?
We hope you did!. If you are still unsure with some definitions, don’t hesitate to search them here with our crossword solver.

Possible Answers: APE, SKIT, SATIRE, FARCE, SPOOF, PUTON, SENDUP, LAMPOON, TRAVESTY, TAKEOFF.

Last seen on: –The Sun – Two Speed Crossword – Jan 28 2021
The Sun – Two Speed Crossword – Dec 25 2020
The Sun – Two Speed Crossword – Oct 30 2020
Universal Crossword – Apr 8 2020
NY Times Crossword 8 Sep 19, Sunday
NY Times Crossword 10 Aug 19, Saturday
The Washington Post Crossword – May 20 2019
LA Times Crossword 20 May 19, Monday
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Feb 23 2019
Universal Crossword – Dec 27 2018
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Aug 30 2018
Wall Street Journal Crossword – Aug 13 2018 – Front Loads

Random information on the term “APE”:

Comet is a web application model in which a long-held HTTP request allows a web server to push data to a browser, without the browser explicitly requesting it. Comet is an umbrella term, encompassing multiple techniques for achieving this interaction. All these methods rely on features included by default in browsers, such as JavaScript, rather than on non-default plugins. The Comet approach differs from the original model of the web, in which a browser requests a complete web page at a time.


New Crossword clues and help App now available in the App Store and Google Play Store!
Crossword clues app Android Crossword clues app iphone iOs

The use of Comet techniques in web development predates the use of the word Comet as a neologism for the collective techniques. Comet is known by several other names, including Ajax Push, Reverse Ajax, Two-way-web, HTTP Streaming, and HTTP server push among others. The term Comet is not an acronym, but was coined by Alex Russell in his 2006 blog post Comet: Low Latency Data for the Browser.

The ability to embed Java applets into browsers (starting with Netscape 2.0 in March 1996) made two-way sustained communications possible, using a raw TCP socket to communicate between the browser and the server. This socket can remain open as long as the browser is at the document hosting the applet. Event notifications can be sent in any format – text or binary – and decoded by the applet.

APE on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “SATIRE”:

A novel is any relatively long piece of written narrative fiction, normally in prose, and typically published as a book.

The genre has also been described as possessing, “a continuous and comprehensive history of about two thousand years”. This view sees the novel’s origins in Classical Greece and Rome, medieval, early modern romance, and the tradition of the novella. The latter, an Italian word used to describe short stories, supplied the present generic English term in the 18th century. Ian Watt, however, in The Rise of the Novel (1957) suggests that the novel first came into being in the early 18th century,

Miguel de Cervantes, author of Don Quixote, is frequently cited as the first significant European novelist of the modern era; the first part of Don Quixote was published in 1605.

The romance is a closely related long prose narrative. Walter Scott defined it as “a fictitious narrative in prose or verse; the interest of which turns upon marvellous and uncommon incidents”, whereas in the novel “the events are accommodated to the ordinary train of human events and the modern state of society”. However, many romances, including the historical romances of Scott, Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights and Herman Melville’s Moby-Dick, are also frequently called novels, and Scott describes romance as a “kindred term”. Romance, as defined here, should not be confused with the genre fiction love romance or romance novel. Other European languages do not distinguish between romance and novel: “a novel is le roman, der Roman, il romanzo.”

SATIRE on Wikipedia