Peak

This time we are looking on the crossword clue for: Peak.
it’s A 4 letters crossword puzzle definition. See the possibilities below.

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Possible Answers: ACME, ALP, TOR, TIP, TOP, APEX, CRAG, KNOB, CREST, APOGEE, MAX, CUSP, PRIME, TIPTOP, ZENITH, VERTEX, CRESCENDO, MOUNTAIN, MAXIMUM, TOPOUT.

Last seen on: –LA Times Crossword 21 Sep 19, Saturday
The Washington Post Crossword – Jun 3 2019
Canadiana Crossword – May 27 2019
NY Times Crossword 16 Sep 18, Sunday
The Washington Post Crossword – Sep 7 2018
LA Times Crossword 7 Sep 18, Friday
-The Telegraph – Quick Crossword – November 16 2017

Random information on the term “ACME”:

The Acme Corporation is a fictional corporation that features prominently in the Road Runner/Wile E. Coyote cartoons as a running gag featuring outlandish products that fail or backfire catastrophically at the worst possible times. The name is also used as a generic title in many cartoons, films, TV series, commercials and comic strips. It is used also as an organization’s placeholder name.

The company name in the Road Runner cartoons is ironic, since the word acme is derived from Greek (ακμή; English transliteration: akmē) meaning the peak, zenith or prime, and products from the fictional Acme Corporation are both generic and failure-prone.

The name Acme became popular for businesses by the 1920s, when alphabetized business telephone directories such as the Yellow Pages began to be widespread. An early global Acme brand name was the ‘Acme City’ whistle made from mid 1870s onwards by J Hudson & Co, followed by the ‘Acme Thunderer’, and Acme Siren in 1895. There was a flood of businesses named Acme, including Acme Brick, Acme Markets, and Acme Boots. Early Sears catalogues even contained a number of products with the “Acme” trademark, including anvils, which are frequently used in Warner Bros. cartoons.

ACME on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “ALP”:

Aluminium phosphide (aluminum phosphide) is a highly toxic inorganic compound with the chemical formula AlP used as a wide band gap semiconductor and a fumigant. This colorless solid is generally sold as a grey-green-yellow powder due to the presence of impurities arising from hydrolysis and oxidation.

AlP crystals are dark grey to dark yellow in color and have a zincblende crystal structure with a lattice constant of 5.4510 Å at 300 K. They are thermodynamically stable up to 1,000 °C (1,830 °F).

Aluminium phosphide reacts with water or acids to release phosphine:

AlP is synthesized by combination of the elements:

Caution must be taken to avoid exposing the AlP to any sources of moisture, as this generates toxic phosphine gas.

AlP is used as a rodenticide, insecticide, and fumigant for stored cereal grains. It is used to kill small verminous mammals such as moles and rodents. The tablets or pellets, known as “wheat pills”, typically also contain other chemicals that evolve ammonia which helps to reduce the potential for spontaneous ignition or explosion of the phosphine gas.

ALP on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “TOR”:

A tor, which is also known by geomorphologists as either a castle koppie or kopje, is a large, free-standing rock outcrop that rises abruptly from the surrounding smooth and gentle slopes of a rounded hill summit or ridge crest. In the South West of England, the term is commonly also used for the hills themselves – particularly the high points of Dartmoor in Devon and Bodmin Moor in Cornwall.

The word tor (Cornish: tor, Old Welsh: twrr, Welsh: tŵr, Scottish Gaelic: tòrr), meaning hill, is notable for being one of the very few Celtic loanwords to be borrowed into vernacular English before the modern era – such borrowings are mainly words of a geographic or topographical nature. Another such word is crag (from Welsh craig “rock”).[citation needed]

Tors are landforms created by the erosion and weathering of rock; most commonly granites, but also schists, dacites, dolerites, coarse sandstones and others. Tors are mostly less than 5 meters (16 ft) high. Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain their origin and this remains a topic of discussion among geologists and geomorphologists, and physical geographers. It is considered likely that tors were created by geomorphic processes that differed widely in type and duration according to regional and local differences in climate and rock types.

TOR on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “TIP”:

Tip and ring are the names of the two conductors or sides of a telephone line. The terms originate in reference to the telephone plugs used for connecting telephone calls in manual switchboards. One side of the line is connected to the metal tip of the plug, and the second is connected to a metal ring behind the tip, separated and insulated from the tip by a non-conducting material. When inserted into a jack, the plug’s tip conductor connects first, followed by the ring conductor. In many European countries tip and ring are referred to as the A and B wires.

The ring conductor has a direct current (DC) potential of −48V to −52V with respect to tip conductor when the line is in the on-hook (idle) state. Neither conductor is referenced to ground. Floating both conductors (not referencing either one to ground) minimizes the pickup of hum from any nearby alternating current (AC) power wires.

The terms tip and ring originated in the early days of telephony when telephone operators used plugs to connect customer calls. They are named after the parts of the plug to which the wires were connected. The words are often abbreviated as T and R.


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TIP on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “TOP”:

Top is a brand of cigarette rolling papers distributed by Republic Tobacco of Glenview, Illinois. Republic Tobacco paid an undisclosed amount to acquire the brand from R. J. Reynolds in 1987.

Manufactured and imported into the United States from France, Top papers are available in regular and half size. Both size variations are sold in virtually identical light-yellow-colored packages with blue lettering, as well as a red and blue top which adorns its center. Top papers are most prevalent in the Midwestern United States, where they are popular within the marijuana-smoking culture.

TOP on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “APEX”:

The Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) is a radio telescope 5,100 meters above sea level, at the Llano de Chajnantor Observatory in the Atacama desert in northern Chile, 50 km east of San Pedro de Atacama built and operated by 3 European research institutes. The main dish has a diameter of 12 m and consists of 264 aluminium panels with an average surface accuracy of 17 micrometres (rms). The telescope was officially inaugurated on September 25, 2005.

The APEX telescope is a modified ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter Array) prototype antenna and is at the site of the ALMA observatory. APEX is designed to work at sub-millimetre wavelengths, in the 0.2 to 1.5 mm range — between infrared light and radio waves — and to find targets that ALMA will be able to study in greater detail. Submillimetre astronomy provides a window into the cold, dusty and distant Universe, but the faint signals from space are heavily absorbed by water vapour in the Earth’s atmosphere. Chajnantor was chosen as the location for such a telescope because the region is one of the driest on the planet and is more than 750 m higher than the observatories on Mauna Kea and 2400 m higher than the Very Large Telescope (VLT) on Cerro Paranal.

APEX on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “KNOB”:

KNOB (in Hebrew נוב) (stylized as knob) is an Israeli music duo formed in 2006, that has become a famous dance music act on Israeli dance floors and popular on Israeli radio stations. KNOB is made up of Niv Cohen and Meital Patash-Cohen. The two also do the songwriting with help from Dvir André Tzanua and the production of the materials. Champion Records, UK’s largest indie label, has distributed the band’s biggest international commercial success “I’m Lost”.

After success of “I’m Lost”, the dance record label “TETA: Making Music” signed KNOB for a 3-album contract. With TETA, KNOB released further singles followed by a debut self-titled album knob released in May 2008. Champion Records distributed the album in Europe and North America.

Niv Cohen of KNOB was active in music being the owner of the Garage Music Studio in Tel Aviv and is the producer of the band. Meital Patash-Cohen, Niv’s wife, does the vocals, with Niv joining her in singing at times. Meital also writes and composes the music of the band.

KNOB on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “CREST”:

The Crest is a historic house on Eatons Neck in Suffolk County, New York. Although on the land mass of Eatons Neck, the house today is within the jurisdiction of the Incorporated Village of Asharoken. According to the National Register of Historic Places, on which the house is listed, it has also been known as Hasbrouk-DeLamater House and as Robinson House. Another name for the house is Walnut Crest.

The house was built in 1902 for Oakley Ramshon DeLamater who presented the house as a gift to his wife, Elizabeth Hasbrouk DeLamater. Oakley R. DeLamater was the grandson of Cornelius H. DeLamater, who owned the DeLamater Iron Works located where 13th Street meets the Hudson River in New York City. The ironworks is where the turret and machinery was built for the ironclad USS Monitor during the Civil War. The estate, originally named “Walnut Crest” was built on a high crest of land overlooking Walnut Neck. Walnut Neck is a peninsula on the south side of Eatons Neck.

The house was designed by Harry E. Donnell, who was married to another grandchild of Cornelius H. DeLamater.

CREST on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “MAX”:

El Max (Arabic: المكس‎‎) is a neighborhood in Alexandria, Egypt.

MAX on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “PRIME”:

In computational number theory, the Adleman–Pomerance–Rumely primality test is an algorithm for determining whether a number is prime. Unlike other, more efficient algorithms for this purpose, it avoids the use of random numbers, so it is a deterministic primality test. It is named after its discoverers, Leonard Adleman, Carl Pomerance, and Robert Rumely. The test involves arithmetic in cyclotomic fields.

It was later improved by Henri Cohen and Hendrik Willem Lenstra, commonly referred to as APR-CL. It can test primality of an integer n in time:

PRIME on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “TIPTOP”:

Tip Top is a ghost town in Yavapai County in the U.S. state of Arizona. The town was settled in 1876 in what was then the Arizona Territory.

Primarily a silver-mining town, it had a post office from August 12, 1880, until February 14, 1895. The town was founded after Jack Moore and Bill Corning struck a significant lode of silver in 1875.

The nearby ghost town of Gillett was the original mill site for the ore from the Tip Top mine.

Tip Top at its peak had over 500 residents and was one of the largest towns in Arizona at the time.

Many ruins still exist in Tip Top today.

Tip Top is the setting for The Nightjar Women, the last story in the weird western anthology Merkabah Rider: Tales of a High Planes Drifter by Edward M. Erdelac.

Media related to Tip Top, Arizona at Wikimedia Commons

TIPTOP on Wikipedia