Pen name

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Possible Answers: STY, ELIA, ALIAS, BIC, CROSS, FLAIR.

Last seen on: –Newsday.com Crossword – Feb 21 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Sep 4 2018
NY Times Crossword 23 Jul 2018, Monday
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jul 3 2018
-Newsday.com Crossword – Nov 24 2017
-NY Times Crossword 17 Nov 2017, Friday

Random information on the term “ELIA”:

The creative industries refers to a range of economic activities which are concerned with the generation or exploitation of knowledge and information. They may variously also be referred to as the cultural industries (especially in Europe (Hesmondhalgh 2002, p. 14) or the creative economy (Howkins 2001), and most recently they have been denominated as the Orange Economy in Latin America and the Caribbean (Buitrago & Duque 2013).

Howkins’ creative economy comprises advertising, architecture, art, crafts, design, fashion, film, music, performing arts, publishing, R&D, software, toys and games, TV and radio, and video games (Howkins 2001, pp. 88–117). Some scholars consider that education industry, including public and private services, is forming a part of creative industry. There remain, therefore, different definitions of the sector (Hesmondhalgh 2002, p. 12)(DCMS 2006).

The creative industries have been seen to become increasingly important to economic well-being, proponents suggesting that “human creativity is the ultimate economic resource,” (Florida 2002, p. xiii) and that “the industries of the twenty-first century will depend increasingly on the generation of knowledge through creativity and innovation” (Landry & Bianchini 1995, p. 4).

ELIA on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “ALIAS”:

A pseudonym (UK pronunciation: /ˈsjuːdənɪm/ SYOO-də-nim and US pronunciation: /ˈsuːdənɪm/ SOO-də-nim) or alias is a name that a person or group assumes for a particular purpose, which can differ from their original or true name (orthonym). Pseudonyms include stage names and user names (both called screen names), ring names, pen names, nicknames, aliases, superhero or villain identities and code names, gamer identifications, and regnal names of emperors, popes, and other monarchs. Historically, they have often taken the form of anagrams, Graecisms, and Latinisations, although there are many other methods of choosing a pseudonym.


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Pseudonyms should not be confused with new names that replace old ones and become the individual’s full-time name. Pseudonyms are “part-time” names, used only in certain contexts – usually adopted to hide an individual’s real identity, as with writers’ pen names, graffiti artists’ tags, resistance fighters’ or terrorists’ noms de guerre, and computer hackers’ handles. Actors, musicians, and other performers sometimes use stage names, for example, to mask their ethnic backgrounds.

ALIAS on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “BIC”:

Bic National Park is an 33.2 square kilometres (8,200 acres) national park of Quebec, Canada, located on the south shore of the St. Lawrence River, near the villages of Bic and Saint-Fabien, southwest of Rimouski. It was founded on October 17, 1984, and is home to large populations of harbor seals and gray seals. Its highest point is Pic Champlain at 1,140 feet (350 m). Slightly less than half of the park is a coastal marine environment.

The park is owned by the Ministry of Sustainable Development, Environment and Parks of Quebec. It is managed by the Société des établissements de plein air du Québec (SÉPAQ).

Bic National Park is typical of the southern coast of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, containing several characteristics of this region:

Human occupation of Bic dates back almost 7,000 years, when Native Americans visited the site: the park’s interpretive center displays tools they left behind.

According to Jacques Cartier, the Battle at Bae de Bic happened in the spring of 1534, 100 Iroquois warriors massacred a group of 200 Mi’kmaq camped on Massacre Island in the St. Lawrence River. Bae de Bic was an annual gather place for the Mi’kmaq along the St. Lawrence. Mi’kmaq scouting parties notified the village that the Iroquois attack the evening before the morning attack. They evacuated 30 of the infirm and elderly and about 200 Mi’kmaq vacated their encampment on the shore and retreated to an island in the bay. They took cover in a cave on the island and covered the entrance with branches. The Iroquois arrived at the vacated village in the morning. Finding it vacated, they divided into search parties but failed to find the Mi’kmaq until the morning of the next day.

BIC on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “FLAIR”:

Lacunar stroke or lacunar infarct (LACI) is the most common type of stroke, and results from the occlusion of small penetrating arteries that provide blood to the brain’s deep structures. Patients who present with symptoms of a lacunar stroke, but who have not yet had diagnostic imaging performed, may be described as suffering from lacunar stroke syndrome (LACS).

Much of the current knowledge of lacunar strokes comes from C. Miller Fisher’s cadaver dissections of post-mortem stroke patients. He observed “lacunae” (empty spaces) in the deep brain structures after occlusion of 200–800 μm penetrating arteries and connected them with five classic syndromes. These syndromes are still noted today, though lacunar infarcts are diagnosed based on clinical judgment and radiologic imaging.

Each of the 5 classical lacunar syndromes has a relatively distinct symptom complex. Symptoms may occur suddenly, progressively, or in a fluctuating (e.g., the capsular warning syndrome) manner. Occasionally, cortical infarcts and intracranial hemorrhages can mimic lacunar infarcts, but true cortical infarct signs (aphasia, visuospatial neglect, gaze deviation, and visual field defects) are always absent. The 5 classic syndromes are as follows:

FLAIR on Wikipedia