Pressure

This time we are looking on the crossword clue for: Pressure.
it’s A 8 letters crossword puzzle definition. See the possibilities below.

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Possible Answers: URGE, HEAT, STRESS, GOAD, COERCE, FORCE, DURESS, LEANON, URGENCY.

Last seen on: –L.A. Times Daily Crossword – Mar 20 2022
USA Today Crossword – Jan 18 2021
The Washington Post Crossword – Jun 11 2020
LA Times Crossword 11 Jun 20, Thursday
LA Times Crossword 10 Apr 20, Friday
The Washington Post Crossword – Apr 10 2020
NY Times Crossword 15 Jun 2018, Friday

Random information on the term “URGE”:

Ellen Victoria Futter (born September 21, 1949) is president of the American Museum of Natural History. She previously served as president of Barnard College for 13 years.

Futter was born in New York City and attended high school in Port Washington, New York. She spent two years at the University of Wisconsin–Madison before transferring to Barnard College, where she graduated Phi Beta Kappa magna cum laude in 1971. She was elected as a student representative to the Barnard’s board of trustees in 1971 and was subsequently elected to full membership to complete the term of Arthur Goldberg, former Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. Futter earned her J.D. from Columbia Law School in 1974.

Futter began her career as an associate at the Wall Street law firm of Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy, where she practiced corporate law. In 1980, Futter took a leave of absence from Milbank, Tweed to serve as Barnard’s acting president for one year. At the end of that period, she was appointed president of the college; at the time, she was the youngest president of any college in the United States. She served as president until 1993, when she joined the American Museum of Natural History.

URGE on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “HEAT”:

High-explosive squash head (HESH) is a type of explosive ammunition that is effective against tank armour and is also useful against buildings. It was fielded chiefly by the British Army as the main explosive round of its main battle tanks during the Cold War. It was also used by other military forces, particularly those that acquired the early post-World War 2 British 105 mm Royal Ordnance L7A1, including Germany, India, Israel and Sweden. In the United States, it is known as HEP, for “high explosive, plastic”.

HESH rounds are thin metal shells filled with plastic explosive and a delayed-action base fuze. The plastic explosive is “squashed” against the surface of the target on impact and spreads out to form a disc or “pat” of explosive. The base fuze detonates the explosive milliseconds later, creating a shock wave that, owing to its large surface area and direct contact with the target, is transmitted through the material. In the case of the metal armour of a tank, the compression shock wave is conducted through the armour to the point where it reaches the metal/air interface (the hollow crew compartment), where some of the energy is reflected as a tension wave. At the point where the compression and tension waves intersect, a high-stress zone is created in the metal, causing pieces of steel to be projected off the interior wall at high velocity. This fragmentation by blast wave is known as spalling, with the fragments themselves known as spall. The spall travels through the interior of the vehicle at high velocity, killing or injuring the crew, damaging equipment, and/or igniting ammunition and fuel. Unlike high-explosive anti-tank (HEAT) rounds, which are shaped charge ammunition, HESH shells are not specifically designed to perforate the armour of main battle tanks. HESH shells rely instead on the transmission of the shock wave through the solid steel armour.

HEAT on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “FORCE”:

In the mathematical discipline of set theory, forcing is a technique discovered by Paul Cohen for proving consistency and independence results. It was first used, in 1963, to prove the independence of the axiom of choice and the continuum hypothesis from Zermelo–Fraenkel set theory. Forcing was considerably reworked and simplified in the following years, and has since served as a powerful technique, both in set theory and in areas of mathematical logic such as recursion theory.

Descriptive set theory uses the notion of forcing from both recursion theory and set theory. Forcing has also been used in model theory, but it is common in model theory to define genericity directly without mention of forcing.

Intuitively, forcing consists of expanding the set theoretical universe

V

{\displaystyle V}

to a larger universe

V

{\displaystyle V^{*}}

. In this bigger universe, for example, one might have lots of new subsets of

ω

{\displaystyle \omega }

=
{
0
,
1
,
2
,

}

{\displaystyle =\{0,1,2,\ldots \}}

that were not there in the old universe, and thereby violate the continuum hypothesis. While impossible on the face of it, this is just another version of Cantor’s paradox about infinity. In principle, one could consider

FORCE on Wikipedia