Reach

This time we are looking on the crossword clue for: Reach.
it’s A 5 letters crossword puzzle definition. See the possibilities below.

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Possible Answers: MEET, SPAN, GET, GAIN, ARRIVE, MAKE, GRASP, SCOPE, GOTO, GETAT, ACCESS, ATTAIN, RUNTO, GETTO, EXTENT, ACHIEVE, EXTEND, CONTACT, ARRIVEAT, ENDUPAT, ATAIN, MAKEITTO.

Last seen on: –Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Dec 2 2020
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Oct 30 2020
NY Times Crossword 25 Oct 20, Sunday
Wall Street Journal Crossword – August 31 2020 – Ballpark Figures
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Mar 30 2020
The Sun – Two Speed Crossword – Dec 21 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Nov 1 2019
NY Times Crossword 22 Oct 19, Tuesday
NY Times Crossword 18 May 19, Saturday
The Washington Post Crossword – May 5 2019
LA Times Crossword 5 May 19, Sunday
LA Times Crossword 20 Mar 19, Wednesday
LA Times Crossword 18 Jan 19, Friday
The Washington Post Crossword – Jan 18 2019
Wall Street Journal Crossword – Sep 6 2018 – Return Flight
Premier Sunday – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Aug 19 2018
LA Times Crossword 14 Aug 2018, Tuesday
NY Times Crossword 10 Jul 2018, Tuesday

Random information on the term “SPAN”:

A span is the distance measured by a human hand, from the tip of the thumb to the tip of the little finger. In ancient times, a span was considered to be half a cubit. Sometimes the distinction is made between the great span (thumb to little finger) and little span (index finger to little finger).

Ancient Greek texts show that the span was used as a fixed measure in ancient Greece since at least archaic period. The word spithame (Greek: “σπιθαμή”), “span”, is attested in the work of Herodotus in the 5th century BC; however, the span was used in Greece long before that, since the word trispithamos (Greek: “τρισπίθαμος”), “three spans long”, occurs as early as the 8th century BC in Hesiod.

See also: English unit

In Arabic, the analogue of the great span is the šibr (شبر). It is used in Modern Standard Arabic and classical Arabic, as well as in modern-day dialects.

In Slavic languages, the analogue of the span is various words derived from Proto-Slavic *pędь (Bulgarian педя, Polish piędź, Russian пядь, Slovenian ped, etc.). In various Slavic languages it is the distance from the tip of the thumb to the tip of the little finger or index finger. For example, Slovenian velika ped = great span (23 cm), mala ped = little span (9.5 cm); Russian piad = 4 vershoks = 17.8 cm. See Obsolete Russian weights and measures.

SPAN on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “GET”:

The get of an animal are the offspring of a particular individual male animal. It is derived from the term “begat”, meaning to father offspring. The term is frequently used in livestock raising and informal animal husbandry, notably horse breeding to describe the offspring of a stallion. In show competition, a “get of sire” class evaluates a group of animals who have the same sire and evaluates the consistency with which a given sire is able to pass on desirable characteristics to his offspring.

GET on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “GAIN”:

In electronics, gain is a measure of the ability of a two-port circuit (often an amplifier) to increase the power or amplitude of a signal from the input to the output port by adding energy converted from some power supply to the signal. It is usually defined as the mean ratio of the signal amplitude or power at the output port to the amplitude or power at the input port. It is often expressed using the logarithmic decibel (dB) units (“dB gain”). A gain greater than one (greater than zero dB), that is amplification, is the defining property of an active component or circuit, while a passive circuit will have a gain of less than one.


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The term gain alone is ambiguous, and can refer to the ratio of output to input voltage (voltage gain), current (current gain) or electric power (power gain). In the field of audio and general purpose amplifiers, especially operational amplifiers, the term usually refers to voltage gain, but in radio frequency amplifiers it usually refers to power gain. Furthermore, the term gain is also applied in systems such as sensors where the input and output have different units; in such cases the gain units must be specified, as in “5 microvolts per photon” for the responsivity of a photosensor. The “gain” of a bipolar transistor normally refers to forward current transfer ratio, either hFE (“Beta”, the static ratio of Ic divided by Ib at some operating point), or sometimes hfe (the small-signal current gain, the slope of the graph of Ic against Ib at a point).

GAIN on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “MAKE”:

In software development, Make is a build automation tool that automatically builds executable programs and libraries from source code by reading files called Makefiles which specify how to derive the target program. Though integrated development environments and language-specific compiler features can also be used to manage a build process, Make remains widely used, especially in Unix and Unix-like operating systems.

Besides building programs, Make can be used to manage any project where some files must be updated automatically from others whenever the others change.

There are now a number of dependency-tracking build utilities, but Make is one of the most widespread, primarily due to its inclusion in Unix, starting with the PWB/UNIX 1.0, which featured a variety of tools targeting software development tasks. It was originally created by Stuart Feldman in April 1976 at Bell Labs. Feldman received the 2003 ACM Software System Award for the authoring of this widespread tool.

MAKE on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “GRASP”:

Graphics Animation System for Professionals (GRASP) was the first multimedia animation program for the IBM PC family of computers. It was also at one time the most widely used animation format.

Originally conceived by Doug Wolfgram under the name FlashGun, the first public version of GRASP was the Graphical System for Presentation. The original software was written by Doug Wolfgram and Rob Neville. It later became the Graphic Animation System for Professionals. Many regard this as the birth of the multimedia industry.

In 1984 Doug Wolfgram conceived of the idea of an animation scripting language that would allow graphics images to move smoothly across a computer screen under program control. Persyst Systems hired Wolfgram’s company to develop some graphics and animation for their new graphics card, the BoB board. The marketing manager from Persyst then moved to AST computer where he brought in Wolfgram to do similar animation work for the AST line of peripheral cards for PCs. 1

GRASP on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “SCOPE”:

Scope is a disability charity working with disabled people and their families in England and Wales. It runs support services such as schools, a college, residential care, training, short breaks and runs a helpline providing information and advice on disability. Scope also campaigns for the full inclusion and equal participation of disabled people in society.

It was founded as the National Spastics Society on 9 October 1951 by Ian Dawson-Shepherd, Eric Hodgson, Alex Moira and a social worker, Jean Garwood, with the aim of improving and expanding services for people with cerebral palsy.

From 1955 to 1989, the society ran the Thomas Delarue School, a specialist secondary boarding school at Tonbridge, Kent. Scope still runs schools for disabled children in West Sussex and near Cardiff as well as a Further Education College in Lancaster, which was founded in 1977.

Over time, thanks in large part to the influence of Bill Hargreaves, the first trustee with cerebral palsy, the charity’s aims extended to improving and expanding services for people with cerebral palsy and disabled people in general. Bill’s pioneering work in employment in the 1950s supported over 1,500 disabled people into their first jobs. In 1962, he set up the 62 Clubs where disabled people could choose and control their own leisure activities. Through its employment services, Scope continues to support disabled people to have the same opportunities as everyone else.

SCOPE on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “GOTO”:

In computer programming, a subroutine is a sequence of program instructions that perform a specific task, packaged as a unit. This unit can then be used in programs wherever that particular task should be performed.

Subprograms may be defined within programs, or separately in libraries that can be used by multiple programs. In different programming languages, a subroutine may be called a procedure, a function, a routine, a method, or a subprogram. The generic term callable unit is sometimes used.

The name subprogram suggests a subroutine behaves in much the same way as a computer program that is used as one step in a larger program or another subprogram. A subroutine is often coded so that it can be started (called) several times and from several places during one execution of the program, including from other subroutines, and then branch back (return) to the next instruction after the call, once the subroutine’s task is done. Maurice Wilkes, David Wheeler, and Stanley Gill are credited with the invention of this concept, which they termed a closed subroutine, contrasted with an open subroutine or macro.

GOTO on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “ACCESS”:

ACCESS is the youth network of the Australian Institute of International Affairs, a non-government institution dealing with all aspects of Australia’s foreign relations and international affairs.

Founded in 2005, ACCESS hosts forums for discussion in the tradition of the Council on Foreign Relations and Chatham House. ACCESS also produces two publications on international affairs: ‘Monthly Access’, an online monthly publication, and ‘Quarterly Access’, a more in-depth, quarterly print publication.

Currently, there are ACCESS branches in three Australian cities: Sydney, Melbourne and Canberra.

ACCESS on Wikipedia