Robert who pioneered in electronic music

Now we are looking on the crossword clue for: Robert who pioneered in electronic music.
it’s A 40 letters crossword puzzle definition.
Next time, try using the search term “Robert who pioneered in electronic music crossword” or “Robert who pioneered in electronic music crossword clue” when searching for help with your puzzle on the web. See the possible answers for Robert who pioneered in electronic music below.

Did you find what you needed?
We hope you did!. If you are still unsure with some definitions, don’t hesitate to search them here with our crossword puzzle solver.

Possible Answers:

MOOG.

Last seen on: NY Times Crossword 9 Dec 18, Sunday


New Crossword clues and help App now available in the App Store and Google Play Store!
Crossword clues app Android Crossword clues app iphone iOs

Random information on the term “MOOG”:

Moog synthesizer (pronounced /moʊɡ/ MOHG; often anglicized to /muːɡ/ MOOG, though Robert Moog preferred the former)[2] may refer to any number of analog synthesizers designed by Robert Moog or manufactured by Moog Music, and is commonly used as a generic term for older-generation analog music synthesizers. The Moog company pioneered the commercial manufacture of modular voltage-controlled analog synthesizer systems in the mid 1960s. The technological development that led to the creation of the Moog synthesizer was the invention of the transistor, which enabled researchers like Moog to build electronic music systems that were considerably smaller, cheaper and far more reliable than earlier vacuum tube-based systems.

The Moog synthesizer gained wider attention in the music industry after it was demonstrated at the Monterey International Pop Festival in 1967. The commercial breakthrough of a Moog recording was made by Wendy Carlos in the 1968 record Switched-On Bach, which became one of the highest-selling classical music recordings of its era.[3] The success of Switched-On Bach sparked a slew of other synthesizer records in the late 1960s to mid-1970s.

MOOG on Wikipedia