Round number

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Possible Answers: TEN, PAR, ZERO.

Last seen on: –Newsday.com Crossword – Jan 30 2022

Random information on the term “TEN”:

10 (ten i/ˈtɛn/) is an even natural number following 9 and preceding 11. Ten is the base of the decimal numeral system, by far the most common system of denoting numbers in both spoken and written language. The reason for the choice of ten is assumed to be that humans have ten fingers (digits).

Ten is a composite number, its proper divisors being 1, 2 and 5. Ten is the smallest noncototient, a number that cannot be expressed as the difference between any integer and the total number of coprimes below it.

Ten is the second discrete semiprime (2 × 5) and the second member of the (2 × q) discrete semiprime family. Ten has an aliquot sum σ(n) of 8 and is accordingly the first discrete semiprime to be in deficit. All subsequent discrete semiprimes are in deficit. The aliquot sequence for 10 comprises five members (10,8,7,1,0) with this number being the second composite member of the 7-aliquot tree.

Ten is the smallest semiprime that is the sum of all the distinct prime numbers from its lower factor through its higher factor (10 = 2 + 3 + 5 = 2 . 5) Only three other small semiprimes (39, 155, and 371) share this attribute.

TEN on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “PAR”:

Par is a scoring system used mostly in amateur and club golf. It involves scoring (+, 0, −) based on results at each hole. The objective is to have an end score with more pluses than minuses. The result on each hole is always based on one’s handicap-adjusted score.

For ease of explanation, assume a player’s handicap gives him/her one stroke per hole (i.e., 9-hole handicap of 9). This player, playing to his/her handicap on a given day, will average a bogey on each hole. Playing ‘to’ ones handicap is expected and so there is no reward or punishment due when a bogey 5 is recorded on a par 4. Thus, a 0 (zero) is recorded. A double-bogey 6 (one over what’s expected from a player on a 9 handicap, would incur a penalty of a minus ‘−’. A 4 (a genuine, unadjusted par) is one better than a ‘9-handicapper’ would be expected to score and would earn a plus ‘+’. However, for this golfer, 6s and above still incur just one minus ‘−’. Likewise, 4s and below earn just one plus ‘+’. At the end of the round, plusses and minuses are reconciled (a minus cancels out a plus). If a player finishes with two plusses, s/he is ‘two up’ or ‘plus 2’ (+2). The opposite applies if s/he finishes with two minuses – ‘two down’; ‘minus 2’; ‘−2’.

PAR on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “ZERO”:

In complex analysis, a zero (sometimes called a root) of a holomorphic function f is a complex number a such that f(a) = 0.

A complex number a is a simple zero of f, or a zero of multiplicity 1 of f, if f can be written as

where g is a holomorphic function such that g(a) is nonzero.

Generally, the multiplicity of the zero of f at a is the positive integer n for which there is a holomorphic function g such that

The multiplicity of a zero a is also known as the order of vanishing of the function at a.

The fundamental theorem of algebra says that every nonconstant polynomial with complex coefficients has at least one zero in the complex plane. This is in contrast to the situation with real zeros: some polynomial functions with real coefficients have no real zeros. An example is f(x) = x2 + 1.

An important property of the set of zeros of a holomorphic function of one variable (that is not identically zero) is that the zeros are isolated. In other words, for any zero of a holomorphic function there is a small disc around the zero which contains no other zeros. There are also some theorems in complex analysis which show the connections between the zeros of a holomorphic (or meromorphic) function and other properties of the function. In particular Jensen’s formula and Weierstrass factorization theorem are results for complex functions which have no counterpart for functions of a real variable.

ZERO on Wikipedia