Run off

This time we are looking on the crossword clue for: Run off.
it’s A 7 letters crossword puzzle definition. See the possibilities below.

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Possible Answers: ELOPE, SHOO, LEAVE, FLEE, REPEL, BOLT, ESCAPE, DRAIN, PRINT, XEROX, SKEDADDLE, SCAREAWAY, CHASEAWAY, TAKETOONESHEELS, TAKEFLIGHT.

Last seen on: –Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Dec 1 2022
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Oct 20 2022
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Oct 19 2022
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Oct 13 2022
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Feb 6 2021
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Sep 16 2020
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Dec 7 2018
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Aug 28 2018

Random information on the term “BOLT”:

Wi-Fi or WiFi is a technology for wireless local area networking with devices based on the IEEE 802.11 standards. Wi-Fi is a trademark of the Wi-Fi Alliance, which restricts the use of the term Wi-Fi Certified to products that successfully complete interoperability certification testing.

Devices that can use Wi-Fi technology include personal computers, video-game consoles, smartphones, digital cameras, tablet computers, digital audio players and modern printers. Wi-Fi compatible devices can connect to the Internet via a WLAN and a wireless access point. Such an access point (or hotspot) has a range of about 20 meters (66 feet) indoors and a greater range outdoors. Hotspot coverage can be as small as a single room with walls that block radio waves, or as large as many square kilometres achieved by using multiple overlapping access points.

Wi-Fi most commonly uses the 2.4 gigahertz (12 cm) UHF and 5 gigahertz (6 cm) SHF ISM radio bands. Having no physical connections, it is more vulnerable to attack than wired connections, such as Ethernet.

BOLT on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “ESCAPE”:

Escapism is the avoidance of unpleasant, boring, arduous, scary, or banal aspects of daily life. It can also be used as a term to define the actions people take to help relieve persisting feelings of depression or general sadness.

Entire industries have sprung up to foster a growing tendency of people to remove themselves from the rigors of daily life – especially into the digital world. Many activities that are normal parts of a healthy existence (e.g., eating, sleeping, exercise, sexual activity) can also become avenues of escapism when taken to extremes or out of proper context; and as a result the word “escapism” often carries a negative connotation, suggesting that escapists are unhappy, with an inability or unwillingness to connect meaningfully with the world and to take necessary action. Indeed, the OED defined escapism as “The tendency to seek, or the practice of seeking, distraction from what normally has to be endured”.

However, many challenge the idea that escapism is fundamentally and exclusively negative. C. S. Lewis was fond of humorously remarking that the usual enemies of escape were jailers; and considered that used in moderation escapism could serve both to refresh and to expand the imaginative powers. Similarly J. R. R. Tolkien argued for escapism in fantasy literature as the creative expression of reality within a Secondary (imaginative) world, (but also emphasised that they required an element of horror in them, if they were not to be ‘mere escapism’). Terry Pratchett considered that the twentieth-century had seen the development over time of a more positive view of escapist literature.

ESCAPE on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “PRINT”:

Printing is a process for reproducing text and images using a master form or template. The earliest examples include Cylinder seals and other objects such as the Cyrus Cylinder and the Cylinders of Nabonidus. The earliest known form of woodblock printing came from China dating to before 220 A.D. Later developments in printing include the movable type, first developed by Bi Sheng in China around 1040 AD. Johannes Gutenberg introduced mechanical movable type printing to Europe in the 15th century. His printing press played a key role in the development of the Renaissance, Reformation, the Age of Enlightenment, and the scientific revolution and laid the material basis for the modern knowledge-based economy and the spread of learning to the masses.

Modern large-scale printing is typically done using a printing press, while small-scale printing is done free-form with a digital printer. Though paper is the most common material, it is also frequently done on metals, plastics, cloth, and composite materials. On paper it is often carried out as a large-scale industrial process and is an essential part of publishing and transaction printing.

PRINT on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “XEROX”:

David Owen (born February 14, 1955) is an American journalist and author.

David Owen grew up in Kansas City, Missouri, and graduated from The Pembroke-Country Day School in 1973. He attended Colorado College, then transferred to Harvard University, where he was an editor of the Harvard Lampoon, as was his future wife, Ann Hodgman. He graduated from Harvard in 1978 with a degree in English.

Owen has been a staff writer for The New Yorker since 1991 and a contributing editor of Golf Digest since 1995; previously he was a contributing editor of The Atlantic Monthly and a senior writer for Harper’s Magazine. For six years he was a regular columnist for Home Magazine. He was also a contributing editor and columnist for Spy.

Owen won an Alicia Patterson Journalism Fellowship in 1984 to research and write about standardized testing in the American education system.

Owen lives in Washington, Connecticut with his wife, Ann Hodgman. They have two children, both writers: Laura Hazard Owen and John Bailey Owen.

XEROX on Wikipedia