Spoilt kid runs into vampire?

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BRAT.

Last seen on: The Sun – Two Speed Crossword – Jan 24 2020

Random information on the term “BRAT”:

A spoiled child or spoiled brat is a derogatory term aimed at children who exhibit behavioral problems from being overindulged by their parents or other caregivers. Children and teens who are perceived as spoiled may be described as “overindulged”, “grandiose”, “narcissistic” or “egocentric-regressed”. Perception is important to take into account, because when the child has a neurological condition such as autism, ADHD or intellectual disability, observers may judge them as “spoiled” without understanding the whole picture. There is no accepted scientific definition of what “spoiled” means, and professionals are often unwilling to use the label because it is considered vague and derogatory. Being spoiled is not recognized as a mental disorder in any of the medical manuals, such as the ICD-10 or the DSM-IV, or its successor, the DSM-5.


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Richard Weaver, in his work Ideas Have Consequences, introduced the term “spoiled child psychology” in 1948. In 1989, Bruce McIntosh coined the term the “spoiled child syndrome”. The syndrome is characterized by “excessive, self-centered, and immature behavior”. It includes lack of consideration for other people, recurrent temper tantrums, an inability to handle the delay of gratification, demands for having one’s own way, obstructiveness, and manipulation to get their way. McIntosh attributed the syndrome to “the failure of parents to enforce consistent, age-appropriate limits”, but others, such as Aylward, note that temperament is probably a contributory factor. It is important to note that the temper tantrums are recurrent. McIntosh observes that “many of the problem behaviors that cause parental concern are unrelated to spoiling as properly understood”. Children may have occasional temper tantrums without them falling under the umbrella of “spoiled”. Extreme cases of spoiled child syndrome, in contrast, will involve frequent temper tantrums, physical aggression, defiance, destructive behavior, and refusal to comply with even the simple demands of daily tasks. This can be similar to the profile of children diagnosed with Pathological Demand Avoidance, which is part of the autism spectrum.

BRAT on Wikipedia