State of Japan

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Possible Answers:

ZEN.

Last seen on: NY Times Crossword 23 Oct 19, Wednesday

Random information on the term “State of Japan”:

The Japanese era name (年号, nengō, “year name”), also known as gengō (元号), is the first of the two elements that identify years in the Japanese era calendar scheme. The second element is a number which indicates the year number within the era (with the first year being “gan (元)”), followed by the literal “nen (年)” meaning “year”.

As elsewhere in East Asia, the use of nengō was originally derived from Chinese Imperial practice, although the Japanese system is independent of the Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese era-naming systems. Unlike some of these other similar systems, Japanese era names are still in use. Government offices usually require era names and years for official papers.


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The four era names used since the end of the Edo period in 1868 can be abbreviated by taking the first letter of their romanized names. For example, S55 means Shōwa 55 (i.e. 1980), and H22 stands for Heisei 22 (2010). At 62 years and 2 weeks, Shōwa is the longest era to date.

State of Japan on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “ZEN”:

Zona Espansione Nord, also known as ZEN or San Filippo Neri, is an economically deprived quarter on the northern outskirts of Palermo, Sicily. It is located in the VII municipality and has a population of around 16,000 people. It was constructed in 1969, under the design by architect Vittorio Gregotti, and it consists of bleak, multi-storied housing projects, most of which are in a state of dilapidation. As a result of rampant unemployment, poverty, high school drop-out rate and marginalization of the residents, ZEN has become notorious for its crime, juvenile delinquency, and social degradation. The architect Massimiliano Fuksas proposed its demolition, together with other similar structures in Italy, such as the Corviale in Rome.

In 1997, ZEN changed its name to San Filippo Neri, but most Palermitans refer to it by its former name. Italian director Marco Risi used ZEN as the setting for his 1990 film Ragazzi fuori, which depicted the social problems and lack of opportunities faced by the unemployed youth of ZEN.

ZEN on Wikipedia