Stop order?

This time we are looking on the crossword clue for: Stop order?.
it’s A 11 letters crossword puzzle definition. See the possibilities below.

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Possible Answers: HALT, WHOA, WAIT, DONT, AVASTMEHEARTIES.

Random information on the term “HALT”:

A train station, railway station, railroad station, or depot (see below) is a railway facility where trains regularly stop to load or unload passengers or freight.

It generally consists of at least one track-side platform and a station building (depot) providing such ancillary services as ticket sales and waiting rooms. If a station is on a single-track line, it often has a passing loop to facilitate traffic movements. The smallest stations are most often referred to as “stops” or, in some parts of the world, as “halts” (flag stops).

Stations may be at ground level, underground, or elevated. Connections may be available to intersecting rail lines or other transport modes such as buses, trams or other rapid transit systems.

In Britain and other Commonwealth countries, traditional usage favours railway station or simply station, even though train station, which is often perceived as an Americanism, is now about as common as railway station; railroad station is not used, the term railroad being obsolete in the United States. In British usage, the word station is commonly understood to mean a railway station unless otherwise qualified.

HALT on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “WAIT”:

The word ‘Wait,” anciently spelled Wayghte or Wayte, is derived from the old high German wahten (to keep watch); it is common in the sense of guard or watchman to all the Teutonic languages, the German wacht, Dutch vaght, Swedish vakt and English watch. When used as a verb, its meaning is “to stay in expectation of”; as a noun, it denotes a minstrel watchmen.

When surnames were generally introduced into England in the eleventh century, those who held an office in most cases added its designation to their Christian names, thus: Richard, the minstral-watchman, who was known as Richard le (the) Wayte, afterward contracted to Richard Wayte. The name has since been spelled Wayte, Wavt, Wayght, Waight, Wait, Waitt, Wate, Weight, Waiet, etc.

WAIT on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “DONT”:

This is a list of defensive conventions used in the game of contract bridge to compete in the bidding after the opponents have opened with a one notrump (1NT) bid.

DONT on Wikipedia

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