Swindle

This time we are looking on the crossword clue for: Swindle.
it’s A 7 letters crossword puzzle definition. See the possibilities below.

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Possible Answers: EPSOM, RIP, SCAM, CON, ROB, CLIP, JOB, ROOK, STING, CHEAT, DOIN, DUPE, HOAX, BURN, FRAUD, GULL, BILK, FLEECE, EUCHRE, GOUGE, GYP, CHISEL, BUNCO, COZEN, HUSTLE, RIPOFF, CONJOB, BUNKO, GRIFT, FLIMFLAM, SHELLGAME, MULCT, CONGAME, DEFRAUD, SHORTCHANGE, DOOUTOF.

Last seen on: –Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Feb 23 2021
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jan 29 2021
NY Times Crossword 11 Jan 21, Monday
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Nov 3 2020
USA Today Crossword – Oct 4 2020
NY Times Crossword 3 Oct 20, Saturday
NY Times Crossword 3 Oct 20, Saturday
Wall Street Journal Crossword – July 27 2020 – Selected Anthology
Wall Street Journal Crossword – June 17 2020 – Box Social
NY Times Crossword 8 Jun 20, Monday
NY Times Crossword 25 Apr 20, Saturday
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Apr 2 2020
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Mar 21 2020
Daily Celebrity Crossword – 1/31/20 Sports Fan Friday
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jan 13 2020
Wall Street Journal Crossword – November 11 2019 – Reading Between The Lines
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Oct 30 2019
Wall Street Journal Crossword – October 05 2019 – Leading Men
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Sep 28 2019
Wall Street Journal Crossword – August 26 2019 – Championship Run
NY Times Crossword 21 Aug 19, Wednesday
Daily Celebrity Crossword – 7/28/19 People Sunday
Universal Crossword – Jun 11 2019
The Washington Post Crossword – May 7 2019
LA Times Crossword 7 May 19, Tuesday
Daily Celebrity Crossword – 4/6/19 Smartypants Saturday
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Mar 22 2019
The Sun – Two Speed Crossword – Feb 20 2019
The Washington Post Crossword – Feb 14 2019
LA Times Crossword 14 Feb 19, Thursday
Universal Crossword – Dec 30 2018
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Dec 24 2018
NY Times Crossword 15 Dec 18, Saturday
Wall Street Journal Crossword – Oct 30 2018 – Skeleton Crew
Canadiana Crossword – Sep 10 2018
Daily Celebrity Crossword – 9/7/18 Sports Fan Friday
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Sep 5 2018
Newsday.com Crossword – Aug 6 2018
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jul 3 2018
-Mirror Classic Crossword November 13 2017

Random information on the term “RIP”:

A point mutation, or single base modification, is a type of mutation that causes a single nucleotide base substitution, insertion, or deletion of the genetic material, DNA or RNA. The term frameshift mutation indicates the addition or deletion of a base pair.

Repeat induced point mutations are recurring point mutations, discussed below.

Point mutation is a random SNP (single-nucleotide polymorphism) mutation in the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) that occurs at one point. Point mutations usually take place during DNA replication. DNA replication occurs when one double-stranded DNA molecule creates two single strands of DNA, each of which is a template for the creation of the complementary strand. A single point mutation can change the whole DNA sequence. Changing one purine or pyrimidine may change the amino acid that the nucleotides code for.

Point mutations may arise from spontaneous mutations that occur during DNA replication. The rate of mutation may be increased by mutagens. Mutagens can be physical, such as radiation from UV rays, X-rays or extreme heat, or chemical (molecules that misplace base pairs or disrupt the helical shape of DNA). Mutagens associated with cancers are often studied to learn about cancer and its prevention.

RIP on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “SCAM”:

“Scam” is a song by the British band Jamiroquai. The song appeared on the band’s second album, The Return of the Space Cowboy. It is most often cited by fans as one of the most powerful protest songs by the band. Live performances of the song during the The Return of the Space Cowboy tour usually began with a lengthy trumpet solo, and have placed the song at the end of a long chain of songs segued into one another (most often in the order “Blow Your Mind”, “Light Years”, “Who the Funk Do You Think You Are?”, “Emergency on Planet Earth”, “Scam”). During the following tours, the song was mostly standalone. A “smooth remix” of the song was planned for a cancelled remix album called Interpretations from Beyond, which was scheduled to be released after Travelling Without Moving.


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The song was created by merging two live-only Jamiroquai songs from the Emergency on Planet Earth era, “Do That Dance” and “Life Goes on” into one. Many elements were taken from both of the songs, such as the horn/trumpet line from the chorus of “Life Goes On”, and some chord progressions from “Do That Dance”. The album version of the song took heavy damage in terms of sound fidelity, as it was reduced to an “early radio”-like quality.

SCAM on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “CON”:

A confidence trick (synonyms include confidence game, confidence scheme, ripoff, scam and stratagem) is an attempt to defraud a person or group after first gaining their confidence, used in the classical sense of trust. Confidence tricks exploit characteristics of the human psyche such as dishonesty, vanity, compassion, credulity, irresponsibility, naïveté and greed.

The perpetrator of a confidence trick (or “con trick”) is often referred to as a confidence (or “con”) man, con-artist, or a “grifter”. Samuel Thompson (1821–1856) was the original “confidence man.” Thompson was a clumsy swindler who asked his victims to express confidence in him by giving him money or their watch rather than gaining their confidence in a more nuanced way. A few people trusted Thompson with their money and watches. Thompson was arrested in July 1849. Reporting about this arrest, Dr. James Houston, a reporter of the New York Herald, publicized Thompson by naming him the “Confidence Man”. Although Thompson was an unsuccessful scammer, he gained reputation as a genius operator mostly because Houston’s satirical writing wasn’t understood. The National Police Gazette coined the term “confidence game” a few weeks after Houston first used the name, the “confidence man.”

CON on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “ROB”:

Rob is a masculine given name, frequently a shortened version (hypocorism) of Robert. It may refer to:

ROB on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “CLIP”:

RIP-Chip is immunoprecipitation of an RNA-binding protein coupled to reverse transcription and a microarray. It has been used to find interactions between RNA and protein (one protein but many RNA species per analysis).

An alternative methodology (RIP-Seq) is to sequence the RNAs that were pulled down using high-throughput sequencing rather than analyze them with a microarray.

A similar technique is ChIP-on-chip, which detects the binding of proteins to genomic DNA rather than RNA. A competing technique is CLIP-Seq, where the RNA binding protein is cross-linked to the RNA via the use of UV light, followed by nuclease digestion and analyzed with high-throughput sequencing.

CLIP on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “JOB”:

Employment is a relationship between two parties, usually based on a contract where work is paid for, where one party, which may be a corporation, for profit, not-for-profit organization, co-operative or other entity is the employer and the other is the employee. Employees work in return for payment, which may be in the form of an hourly wage, by piecework or an annual salary, depending on the type of work an employee does or which sector she or he is working in. Employees in some fields or sectors may receive gratuities, bonus payment or stock options. In some types of employment, employees may receive benefits in addition to payment. Benefits can include health insurance, housing, disability insurance or use of a gym. Employment is typically governed by employment laws or regulations or legal contracts.

An employee contributes labor and expertise to an endeavor of an employer or of a person conducting a business or undertaking (PCBU) and is usually hired to perform specific duties which are packaged into a job. In a corporate context, an employee is a person who is hired to provide services to a company on a regular basis in exchange for compensation and who does not provide these services as part of an independent business.

JOB on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “ROOK”:

The rook (Corvus frugilegus) is a member of the family Corvidae in the passerine order of birds. It was given its binomial name by Carl Linnaeus in 1758, The binomial is from Latin; Corvus is for “raven”, and frugilegus is Latin for “food-gathering”, from frux, frugis, “fruit”, and legere, “to pick”. The English name is ultimately derived from the bird’s harsh call.

This species, at 45–47 cm in length, is similar in size to or slightly smaller than the carrion crow with black feathers often showing a blue or bluish-purple sheen in bright sunlight. The feathers on the head, neck and shoulders are particularly dense and silky. The legs and feet are generally black and the bill grey-black.

Rooks are distinguished from similar members of the crow family by the bare grey-white skin around the base of the adult’s bill in front of the eyes. The feathering around the legs also looks shaggier and laxer than the congeneric carrion crow. The juvenile is superficially more similar to the crow because it lacks the bare patch at the base of the bill, but it has a thinner bill and loses the facial feathers after about six months. Collective nouns for rooks include building, parliament, clamour and storytelling. Their colonial nesting behaviour gave rise to the term rookery.

ROOK on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “STING”:

Cognitive genomics (or neurative genomics) is the sub-field of genomics pertaining to cognitive function in which the genes and non-coding sequences of an organism’s genome related to the health and activity of the brain are studied. By applying comparative genomics, the genomes of multiple species are compared in order to identify genetic and phenotypical differences between species. Observed phenotypical characteristics related to the neurological function include behavior, personality, neuroanatomy, and neuropathology. The theory behind cognitive genomics is based on elements of genetics, evolutionary biology, molecular biology, cognitive psychology, behavioral psychology, and neurophysiology.

Intelligence is the most extensively studied behavioral trait. In humans, approximately 70% of all genes are expressed in the brain. Genetic variation accounts for 40% of phenotypical variation. Approaches in cognitive genomics have been used to investigate the genetic causes for many mental and neurodegenerative disorders including Down syndrome, Major Depressive Disorder, autism, and Alzheimer’s disease.

STING on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “GYP”:

Gyp Casino (born as Jesper Sporre on May 7, 1961) is a Swedish rock drummer. He played in Warheads (under his real name) and was the original drummer for Hanoi Rocks. He was replaced by Razzle in 1982. Although he does not appear on the cover for Self Destruction Blues, Casino does play on the record.

In 1995, Casino reunited with former Hanoi Rocks bandmate Andy McCoy for a tour with his then band Shooting Gallery.

GYP on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “HUSTLE”:

Katsumasa Kuroki (born January 9, 1973) is a Japanese professional wrestler, better known by his ring name Magnum TOKYO. Most closely associated with the now-defunct HUSTLE professional wrestling promotion, he also competed for World Championship Wrestling, Toryumon, and Dragon Gate as Tokyo Magnum and Magnum TOKYO.

Magnum TOKYO has become popular in Japan for both his high-flying junior-heavyweight style (a style common amongst students of Último Dragón) and his elaborate entrances, which have included dancing through the crowd and dance sequences in the ring with his own dance troupe. His gimmick is that of an adult entertainer, and he often wears eye-masks to the ring while carrying a pink umbrella. At one point in his career, some members of the crowd would actually stuff money into his tights.

Currently, Kuroki works as a Daido-juku Kudo trainer in Japan and Colombia.

Magnum Tokyo was a popular mainstay in Japan’s Dragon Gate promotion. He was trained by Último Dragón and graduated from Dragon’s “Toryumon Gym” in 1997, making his professional wrestling debut on May 11, 1997 by defeating fellow débutante Nobuhiko Oshima. After his first match he would become Magnum Tokyo and developed his character over the year. He would also make appearances for Consejo Mundial de Lucha Libre and International Wrestling Revolution Group. Magnum defeated Tony Rivera in the final of the Young Dragons Cup 1997. On July 5, he defeated El Hijo del Gladiador for the IWRG Intercontinental Middleweight Championship and held it for three months before losing it to Mr. Niebla.

HUSTLE on Wikipedia