Take a break

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Possible Answers: SIT, REST, STOP, NOD, RELAX, PAUSE, CATNAP, RESTUP, INTERMIT, COOLSONESHEELS.

Last seen on: –USA Today Crossword – Apr 20 2019
Universal Crossword – Mar 25 2019
The Washington Post Crossword – Mar 14 2019
LA Times Crossword 14 Mar 19, Thursday
Canadiana Crossword – Dec 24 2018
Newsday.com Crossword – Sep 4 2018
The Washington Post Crossword – Jul 24 2018
LA Times Crossword 24 Jul 2018, Tuesday
Canadiana Crossword – Jul 23 2018
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jul 18 2018

Random information on the term “SIT”:

Sit is an uninhabited Croatian island in the Adriatic Sea located between Žut and Pašman. Its area is 1.77 km2 (0.68 sq mi).

The coastline is not significantly indented, except for the bay Pahaljica (Čitapićev port) to the north of the island. Its middle width of 500 m consists of only one mountain ridge, where the highest elevation Veli vrh (84 m.a.s.l.) is located in the eastern part of the island, the central hill Vlašić is 78 m.a.s.l., and the northwest end Borovac is 60 m.a.s.l.

SIT on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “REST”:

Scalability is the capability of a system, network, or process to handle a growing amount of work, or its potential to be enlarged to accommodate that growth. For example, a system is considered scalable if it is capable of increasing its total output under an increased load when resources (typically hardware) are added. An analogous meaning is implied when the word is used in an economic context, where a company’s scalability implies that the underlying business model offers the potential for economic growth within the company.

Scalability, as a property of systems, is generally difficult to define and in any particular case it is necessary to define the specific requirements for scalability on those dimensions that are deemed important. It is a highly significant issue in electronics systems, databases, routers, and networking. A system whose performance improves after adding hardware, proportionally to the capacity added, is said to be a scalable system.

An algorithm, design, networking protocol, program, or other system is said to scale if it is suitably efficient and practical when applied to large situations (e.g. a large input data set, a large number of outputs or users, or a large number of participating nodes in the case of a distributed system). If the design or system fails when a quantity increases, it does not scale. In practice, if there are a large number of things (n) that affect scaling, then resource requirements (for example, algorithmic time-complexity) must grow less than n2 as n increases. An example is a search engine, which scales not only for the number of users, but also for the number of objects it indexes. Scalability refers to the ability of a site to increase in size as demand warrants.

REST on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “STOP”:

In music, a double stop refers to the technique of playing two notes simultaneously on a bowed stringed instrument such as a violin, a viola, a cello, or a double bass. In performing a double stop, two separate strings are bowed or plucked simultaneously. Although the term itself suggests these strings are to be fingered (stopped), in practice one or both strings may be open.

A triple stop is the same technique applied to three strings; a quadruple stop applies to four strings. Double, triple, and quadruple stopping are collectively known as multiple stopping.


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Early extensive examples of the double-stop and string chords appear in Carlo Farina’s Capriccio Stravagante from 1627, and in certain of the sonatas of Biagio Marini’s op. 8 of 1629.

On instruments with a curved bridge, it is difficult to bow more than two strings simultaneously. Early treatises make it clear that composers did not expect three notes to be played at once, even though the notes may be written in a way as to suggest this. Playing four notes at once is almost impossible. The normal way of playing three or four note chords is to sound the lower notes briefly and allow them to ring while the bow plays the upper notes (a broken chord). This gives the illusion of a true triple or quadruple stop. In forte, however, it is possible to play three notes at once, especially when bowed toward the fingerboard. With this technique more pressure than usual is needed on the bow, so this cannot be practiced in softer passages. This technique is mainly used in music with great force, such as the cadenza-like solo at the beginning of the last movement of Tchaikovsky’s violin concerto.

STOP on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “NOD”:

A nod of the head is a gesture in which the head is tilted in alternating up and down arcs along the sagittal plane. In many cultures, it is most commonly, but not universally, used to indicate agreement, acceptance, or acknowledgment.

Different cultures assign different meanings to the gesture. Nodding to indicate “yes” is widespread, and appears in a large number of diverse cultural and linguistic groups. Areas in which nodding generally takes this meaning include the Indian subcontinent (note that the head bobble also shows agreement there), the Middle East, Southeast Asia, most of Europe (see below), Latin America and North America. Nodding may also be used as a sign of recognition in some areas, or to show respect. An insult may be inferred if it is not returned in kind.

In Greece, the single nod of the head down that indicates “yes” is often combined with closing the eyes simultaneously. This nod commonly also includes a very slight, almost unnoticeable, turn of the head to the left (or to the right).

NOD on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “RELAX”:

In computing, RELAX NG (REgular LAnguage for XML Next Generation) is a schema language for XML – a RELAX NG schema specifies a pattern for the structure and content of an XML document. A RELAX NG schema is itself an XML document but RELAX NG also offers a popular compact, non-XML syntax. Compared to other XML schema languages RELAX NG is considered relatively simple.

It was defined by a committee specification of the OASIS RELAX NG technical committee in 2001 and 2002, based on Murata Makoto’s RELAX and James Clark’s TREX, and also by part two of the international standard ISO/IEC 19757: Document Schema Definition Languages (DSDL). ISO/IEC 19757-2 was developed by ISO/IEC JTC1/SC34 and published in its first version in 2003.

Suppose we want to define an extremely simple XML markup scheme for a book: a book is defined as a sequence of one or more pages; each page contains text only. A sample XML document instance might be:

A RELAX NG schema can be written in a nested structure by defining a root element that contains further element definitions, which may themselves contain embedded definitions. A schema for our book in this style, using the full XML syntax, would be written:

RELAX on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “PAUSE”:

The Break key of a computer keyboard refers to breaking a telegraph circuit, and originated with 19th century practice. In modern usage, the key has no well-defined purpose, but while this is the case it can be used by software for miscellaneous tasks, such as to switch between multiple login sessions, to terminate a program, or to interrupt a modem connection.

Because the break function is usually combined with the pause function on one key since the introduction of the IBM Model M 101-key keyboard in 1985, the Break key is also called the Pause key. It can be used to pause some computer games.

A standard telegraph circuit connects all the keys, sounders and batteries in a single series loop. Thus the sounders actuate only when both keys are down (closed, also known as “marking” — after the ink marks made on paper tape by early printing telegraphs). So the receiving operator has to hold their key down, or close a built-in shorting switch, in order to let the other operator send. As a consequence the receiving operator could interrupt the sending operator by opening their key, breaking the circuit and forcing it into a “spacing” condition. Both sounders stop responding to the sender’s keying, alerting the sender. (A physical break in the telegraph line would have the same effect.)

PAUSE on Wikipedia