“This earth of majesty, this seat of Mars, / This other ___, demi-paradise”: “Richard II”

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Possible Answers: EDEN.

Last seen on: NY Times Crossword 1 Jun 2018, Friday

Random information on the term ““This earth of majesty, this seat of Mars, / This other ___, demi-paradise”: “Richard II””:

A diacritic – also diacritical mark, diacritical point, or diacritical sign – is a glyph added to a letter, or basic glyph. The term derives from the Ancient Greek διακριτικός (diakritikós, “distinguishing”), from διακρίνω (diakrī́nō, “to distinguish”). Diacritic is primarily an adjective, though sometimes used as a noun, whereas diacritical is only ever an adjective. Some diacritical marks, such as the acute ( ´ ) and grave ( ` ), are often called accents. Diacritical marks may appear above or below a letter, or in some other position such as within the letter or between two letters.


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The main use of diacritical marks in the Latin script is to change the sound-values of the letters to which they are added. Examples are the diaereses in the borrowed French words naïve and Noël, which show that the vowel with the diaeresis mark is pronounced separately from the preceding vowel; the acute and grave accents, which can indicate that a final vowel is to be pronounced, as in saké and poetic breathèd; and the cedilla under the “c” in the borrowed French word façade, which shows it is pronounced /s/ rather than /k/. In other Latin-script alphabets, they may distinguish between homonyms, such as the French là (“there”) versus la (“the”) that are both pronounced /la/. In Gaelic type, a dot over a consonant indicates lenition of the consonant in question.

“This earth of majesty, this seat of Mars, / This other ___, demi-paradise”: “Richard II” on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “EDEN”:

The Garden of Eden (Hebrew גַּן עֵדֶן, Gan ʿEḏen) or (often) Paradise, is the biblical “garden of God”, described most notably in the Book of Genesis chapters 2 and 3, and also in the Book of Ezekiel. Genesis 13:10 refers to the “garden of God” (not called Eden by name), and the “trees of the garden” are mentioned in Ezekiel 31. The Book of Zechariah and the Book of Psalms also refer to trees and water in relation to the temple without explicitly mentioning Eden.

Traditionally, scholars favored deriving the name “Eden” from the Akkadian edinnu, derived from a Sumerian word edin meaning “plain” or “steppe”. Chaim Cohen, however, writes that Eden is more closely related to an Aramaic root word meaning “fruitful, well-watered.” Another interpretation associates the name “Eden” with a Hebrew word for “pleasure”; thus the Douay-Rheims Bible in Genesis 2:8 has the wording “And the Lord God had planted a paradise of pleasure” (rather than “a garden in Eden”). The Hebrew term is translated “pleasure” in Sarah’s secret saying in Genesis 18:12.

EDEN on Wikipedia