Top-notch

This time we are looking on the crossword clue for: Top-notch.
it’s A 9 letters crossword puzzle definition. See the possibilities below.

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Possible Answers: ACE, STAR, AONE, ABET, ACES, ELITE, GREAT, SUPER, APLUS, PRIMO, STELLAR, SUPERB, GRADEA, FIRSTRATE, RATEDA, OFTHEFIRSTWATER, MAJORLEAGUE, WORLDCLASS.

Last seen on: –Universal Crossword – Sep 16 2020
Wall Street Journal Crossword – August 05 2020 – Behaving Badly
NY Times Crossword 13 May 20, Wednesday
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Mar 23 2020
Wall Street Journal Crossword – March 16 2020 – Battery Included
USA Today Crossword – Mar 16 2020
NY Times Crossword 31 Dec 19, Tuesday
USA Today Crossword – Nov 25 2019
Wall Street Journal Crossword – November 06 2019 – Frontrunners
The Washington Post Crossword – May 20 2019
LA Times Crossword 20 May 19, Monday
Newsday.com Crossword – May 14 2019
Universal Crossword – May 10 2019
Newsday.com Crossword – Apr 7 2019
Wall Street Journal Crossword – Jan 2 2019 – Put a Lid on It!
NY Times Crossword 25 Oct 18, Thursday
NY Times Crossword 3 Oct 18, Wednesday
-Wall Street Journal Crossword – Sep 10 2018 – Teams’ Schemes
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Aug 16 2018
Wall Street Journal Crossword – Aug 13 2018 – Front Loads
Newsday.com Crossword – Aug 8 2018
The Washington Post Crossword – July 8 2018
LA Times Crossword 8 Jul 2018, Sunday
-Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Nov 21 2017

Random information on the term “ACE”:

In baseball, an ace is the best starting pitcher on a team and nearly always the first pitcher in the team’s starting rotation. Barring injury or exceptional circumstances, an ace typically starts on Opening Day. In addition, aces are usually preferred to start crucial playoff games, sometimes on three days rest.

The term may be a derivation of the nickname of Asa Brainard, (real first name: “Asahel”), a 19th-century star pitcher, who was sometimes referred to as “Ace”.

In the early days of baseball, the term “ace” was used to refer to a run.

A lot of modern baseball analysts and fans have started using the term “ace” to refer to the elite pitchers in the game, not necessarily to the best starting pitcher on each team. For example, the April 27, 1981 Sports Illustrated cover was captioned “The Amazing A’s and Their Five Aces” to describe the starting rotation of the 1981 Oakland Athletics.

ACE on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “STAR”:

In typography, a star is any of several glyphs with a number of points arrayed within an imaginary circle.

See also:

See also:

See also:

See also:

STAR on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “ABET”:

CSAB, Inc., formerly called the Computing Sciences Accreditation Board, Inc., is a non-profit professional organization in the United States, focused on the quality of education in computing disciplines. The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and the IEEE Computer Society (IEEE-CS) are the member societies of CSAB. The Association for Information Systems (AIS) was a member society between 2002 and September 2009.

CSAB itself is a member society of ABET, to support the accreditation of several computing (related) disciplines:

Who is doing what:

The Computing Sciences Accreditation Board, Inc. (CSAB) was founded in 1984, with Taylor L. Booth as first president.

Initially, CSAB had its own accreditation commission called the Computer Science Accreditation Commission (CSAC). But in November 1998 CSAB and ABET agreed to integrate CSAB’s accreditation activities within ABET. The result is that in 2000 a reorganized CSAB became a member society of ABET and that, starting with the 2001-2002 cycle, a merged and renamed CSAC operates as the fourth commission of ABET: the Computing Accreditation Commission (CAC).

ABET on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “ACES”:

In baseball, an ace is the best starting pitcher on a team and nearly always the first pitcher in the team’s starting rotation. Barring injury or exceptional circumstances, an ace typically starts on Opening Day. In addition, aces are usually preferred to start crucial playoff games, sometimes on three days rest.

The term may be a derivation of the nickname of Asa Brainard, (real first name: “Asahel”), a 19th-century star pitcher, who was sometimes referred to as “Ace”.

In the early days of baseball, the term “ace” was used to refer to a run.

A lot of modern baseball analysts and fans have started using the term “ace” to refer to the elite pitchers in the game, not necessarily to the best starting pitcher on each team. For example, the April 27, 1981 Sports Illustrated cover was captioned “The Amazing A’s and Their Five Aces” to describe the starting rotation of the 1981 Oakland Athletics.

ACES on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “GREAT”:

Drug Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.) is an education program that seeks to prevent use of controlled drugs, membership in gangs, and violent behavior. It was founded in Los Angeles in 1983 as a joint initiative of then-LAPD chief Daryl Gates and the Los Angeles Unified School District as a demand-side drug control strategy of the American War on Drugs.

Students who enter the program sign a pledge not to use drugs or join gangs and are informed by local police officers about the government’s beliefs about the dangers of recreational drug use in an interactive in-school curriculum which lasts ten weeks.

D.A.R.E. America’s operating revenue has declined from $10 million in 2002 to $3.7 million in 2010 following the publication of government reports that uniformly discredited the effectiveness of the program. D.A.R.E implemented a new curriculum based on work by Penn State and Arizona State researchers.

Its American headquarters is in Inglewood, California. DARE expanded to Great Britain in 1995.

GREAT on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “SUPER”:

SUPER © [sic] (Simplified Universal Player Encoder & Recoder) is a closed-source adware front-end for open-source software video players and encoders provided by the FFmpeg, MEncoder, MPlayer, x264, ffmpeg2theora, musepack, Monkey’s Audio, True Audio, WavPack, libavcodec, and the Theora/Vorbis RealProducer plugIn projects. SUPER © provides a graphical user interface to these back-end programs, which are command-line based.

SUPER can manipulate and produce many multimedia file formats supported by its back-end programs.

As of 2016, SUPER has a built in enhanced 3D Video Converter & Recorder engine.

The proposed 3D variations are: 3D Anaglyph, Polarized or Shutter side-by-side.

v2017.Build.71+3D+Recorder (April 7, 2017) offers the following encoding modes:

Back-end program features supported by SUPER © include saving various streaming protocols (mms, rtsp, and http), conversion of Flash Video to other formats, and user-controlled conversion of video between different container formats. Users can choose between various lossless direct audio/video transfers between container formats or lossy video/audio encoding, with encoding possessing the added ability to change video and audio specifications such as bitrate, frame rate, audio channels, resolution, sampling rate, and aspect ratio. SUPER © is also able to utilize its back-end’s built-in media players, allowing playback of supported video and audio formats.

SUPER on Wikipedia