Unscrupulous

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Possible Answers:

Immoral.

Last seen on: Daily Celebrity Crossword – 7/10/20 Sports Fan Friday

Random information on the term ” Immoral”:

Thomas Penson De Quincey (/də ˈkwɪnsi/; 15 August 1785 – 8 December 1859) was an English essayist, best known for his Confessions of an English Opium-Eater (1821). Many scholars suggest that in publishing this work De Quincey inaugurated the tradition of addiction literature in the West.

Thomas Quincey was born at 86 Cross Street, Manchester, Lancashire. His father, a successful merchant with an interest in literature, died when De Quincey was quite young. Soon after his birth the family went to The Farm and then later to Greenheys, a larger country house in Chorlton-on-Medlock near Manchester. In 1796, three years after the death of his father, Thomas Quincey, his mother – the erstwhile Elizabeth Penson – took the name “De Quincey.” In the same year, De Quincey’s mother moved to Bath, Somerset, and enrolled him at King Edward’s School.

De Quincey was a weak and sickly child. His youth was spent in solitude, and when his elder brother, William, came home, he wrought havoc in the quiet surroundings. De Quincey’s mother (who counted Hannah More amongst her friends) was a woman of strong character and intelligence, but seems to have inspired more awe than affection in her children. She brought them up strictly, taking De Quincey out of school after three years because she was afraid he would become big-headed, and sending him to an inferior school at Wingfield in Wiltshire. It is said that at this time, in 1799, De Quincey first read Lyrical Ballads by Wordsworth and Coleridge.

Immoral on Wikipedia