Way out

This time we are looking on the crossword clue for: Way out.
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Possible Answers: DOOR, AFAR, EXIT, ALIBI, FAR, ULTRA, GATE, ESCAPE, EGRESS, STRANGE, PORTAL, ESCAPEROUTE.

Last seen on: –Premier Sunday – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jul 7 2019
New York Times Crossword – Mar 12 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Feb 18 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Feb 6 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Nov 17 2018
LA Times Crossword 31 Oct 18, Wednesday
The Washington Post Crossword – Sep 9 2018
LA Times Crossword 9 Sep 18, Sunday
Jonesin’ – Jul 10 2018
-Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jun 15 2018

Random information on the term “DOOR”:

A stile is a structure which provides people a passage through or over a fence or boundary via steps, ladders, or narrow gaps. Stiles are often built in rural areas along footpaths, fences, walls or hedges to prevent farm animals moving from one enclosure to another whilst allowing path users still to use the route.

In the United Kingdom many stiles were built under legal compulsion (see Rights of way in the United Kingdom), however in the US there is not a standard design and there are a wide variety of types.

Recent changes in UK government policy towards farming has encouraged upland landowners to make access more available to the public, and this has seen an increase in the number of stiles and an improvement in their overall condition. However, on popular paths, stiles are increasingly replaced by gates or kissing gates or, where the field is arable, the stile removed.

Stiles also sometimes have a ‘dog latch’ or ‘dog gate’ to the side of them, which can be lifted to enable a dog to get through (see pictures below).

DOOR on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “AFAR”:

The Afar (Afar: Qafár), also known as the Danakil, Adali and Odali, are an ethnic group inhabiting the Horn of Africa. They primarily live in the Afar Region of Ethiopia and in northern Djibouti, although some also inhabit the southern point of Eritrea. Afars speak the Afar language, which is part of the Cushitic branch of the Afro-Asiatic family.

Afar society has traditionally been organized into independent kingdoms, each ruled by its own Sultan. Among these were the Sultanate of Aussa, Sultanate of Girrifo, Sultanate of Dawe, Sultanate of Tadjourah, Sultanate of Rahaito, and Sultanate of Goobad.

The earliest surviving written mention of the Afar is from the 13th-century Andalusian writer Ibn Sa’id, who reported that they inhabited the area around the port of Suakin, as far south as Mandeb, near Zeila. They are mentioned intermittently in Ethiopian records, first as helping Emperor Amda Seyon in a campaign beyond the Awash River, then over a century later when they assisted Emperor Baeda Maryam when he campaigned against their neighbors the Dobe’a.

AFAR on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “EXIT”:

A door is a moving structure used to block off, and allow access to, an entrance to or within an enclosed space, such as a building or vehicle. Doors normally consist of a panel that swings on hinges on the edge, but there are also doors that slide or spin inside of a space. Similar exterior structures to doors are called gates.

Typically, doors have an interior side that faces the inside of a space and an exterior side that faces the outside of that space. In many cases the interior side of a door mostly matches its exterior side, but in some other cases there are sharp contrasts between the two sides, such as in the case of a vehicle door.

When open, doors admit people, animals, ventilation or light. The door is used to control the physical atmosphere within a space by enclosing the air drafts, so that interiors may be more effectively heated or cooled. Maybe, people open and close doors as a sign of privacy. Example: A door might be closed and someone is inside, because they are feeling a sort of violation letting people in at that time. Doors are significant in preventing the spread of fire. They also act as a barrier to noise. Many doors are equipped with locking mechanisms to allow entrance to certain people and keep out others. As a form of courtesy and civility, people often knock before opening a door and entering a room.

EXIT on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “FAR”:

The Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) is the principal set of rules in the Federal Acquisition Regulations System. The FAR System governs the “acquisition process” by which executive agencies of the United States federal government acquire (i.e., purchase or lease) goods and services by contract with appropriated funds. The process consists of three phases:


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The FAR System regulates the activities of government personnel in carrying out that process. The FAR System is codified at Title 48, Chapter 1 of the Code of Federal Regulations. These requirements can be found in the Code of Federal Regulations at 48 C.F.R. 31.

While nearly all federal government executive agencies are required to comply with the FAR, some executive agencies are exempt (e.g., the Federal Aviation Administration and the U.S. Mint). In those cases, the agency promulgates its own specific procurement rules. The remainder of the FAR System consists mostly of sets of regulations issued by executive agencies of the federal government of the United States to supplement the FAR.

FAR on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “ULTRA”:

The Enigma machines were a series of electro-mechanical rotor cipher machines developed and used in the early- to mid-twentieth century to protect commercial, diplomatic and military communication. Enigma was invented by the German engineer Arthur Scherbius at the end of World War I. Early models were used commercially from the early 1920s, and adopted by military and government services of several countries, most notably Nazi Germany before and during World War II. Several different Enigma models were produced, but the German military models, having a plugboard, were the most complex. Japanese and Italian models were also in use.

Around December 1932, Marian Rejewski of the Polish Cipher Bureau used the theory of permutations and flaws in the German military message procedures to break the message keys of the plugboard Enigma machine. Rejewski achieved this result without knowledge of the wiring of the machine, so the result did not allow the Poles to decrypt actual messages. The French had a spy with access to German cipher materials that included the daily keys used in September and October 1932. Those keys included the plugboard settings. The French gave the material to the Poles, and Rejewski used some of that material and the message traffic in September and October to solve for the unknown rotor wiring. Consequently, the Poles were able to build their own Enigma machines, which were called Enigma doubles. Rejewski was aided by cryptanalysts Jerzy Różycki and Henryk Zygalski, both of whom had been recruited with Rejewski from Poznań University. The Polish Cipher Bureau developed techniques to defeat the plugboard and find all components of the daily key, which enabled the Cipher Bureau to read the German’s Enigma messages. Over time, the German cryptographic procedures improved, and the Cipher Bureau developed techniques and designed mechanical devices to continue breaking the Enigma traffic. As part of that effort, the Poles exploited quirks of the rotors, compiled catalogs, built a cyclometer to help make a catalog with 100,000 entries, made Zygalski sheets and built the electro-mechanical cryptologic bomb to search for rotor settings. In 1938, the Germans added complexity to the Enigma machines that finally became too expensive for the Poles to counter. The Poles had six bomby, but when the Germans added two more rotors, ten times as many bomby were needed, but the Poles did not have the resources.

ULTRA on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “GATE”:

The field-effect transistor (FET) is a transistor that uses an electric field to control the electrical behaviour of the device. FETs are also known as unipolar transistors since they involve single-carrier-type operation. Many different implementations of field effect transistors exist. Field effect transistors generally display very high input impedance at low frequencies. The conductivity between the drain and source terminals is controlled by an electric field in the device, which is generated by the voltage difference between the body and the gate of the device.

The field-effect transistor was first patented by Julius Edgar Lilienfeld in 1926 and by Oskar Heil in 1934, but practical semiconducting devices (the JFET) were developed only much later after the transistor effect was observed and explained by the team of William Shockley at Bell Labs in 1947, immediately after the 20-year patent period eventually expired.

The first type of JFET (junction field-effect transistor) was the static induction transistor (SIT), invented by Japanese engineers Jun-ichi Nishizawa and Y. Watanabe in 1950. The SIT is a type of JFET with a short channel length. The MOSFET, which largely superseded the JFET and had a profound effect on digital electronic development, was invented by Dawon Kahng and Martin Atalla in 1959.

GATE on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “ESCAPE”:

Escapism is the avoidance of unpleasant, boring, arduous, scary, or banal aspects of daily life. It can also be used as a term to define the actions people take to help relieve persisting feelings of depression or general sadness.

Entire industries have sprung up to foster a growing tendency of people to remove themselves from the rigors of daily life – especially into the digital world. Many activities that are normal parts of a healthy existence (e.g., eating, sleeping, exercise, sexual activity) can also become avenues of escapism when taken to extremes or out of proper context; and as a result the word “escapism” often carries a negative connotation, suggesting that escapists are unhappy, with an inability or unwillingness to connect meaningfully with the world and to take necessary action. Indeed, the OED defined escapism as “The tendency to seek, or the practice of seeking, distraction from what normally has to be endured”.

However, many challenge the idea that escapism is fundamentally and exclusively negative. C. S. Lewis was fond of humorously remarking that the usual enemies of escape were jailers; and considered that used in moderation escapism could serve both to refresh and to expand the imaginative powers. Similarly J. R. R. Tolkien argued for escapism in fantasy literature as the creative expression of reality within a Secondary (imaginative) world, (but also emphasised that they required an element of horror in them, if they were not to be ‘mere escapism’). Terry Pratchett considered that the twentieth-century had seen the development over time of a more positive view of escapist literature.

ESCAPE on Wikipedia