WNBA stat hidden in "scoreboard"

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REB.

Last seen on: Universal Crossword – Mar 26 2020


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Random information on the term “REB”:

Johnny Reb is the national personification of the common soldier of the Confederacy. During the American Civil War and afterwards, Johnny Reb and his Union counterpart Billy Yank were used in speech and literature to symbolize the common soldiers who fought in the Civil War in the 1860s. The symbolic image of Johnny Reb in Southern culture has been represented in its novels, poems, art, public statuary, photography, and written history. According to the historian Bell I. Wiley, who wrote about the common soldier of the Northern and the Southern armies, the name appears to have its origins in the habit of Union soldiers calling out, “Hello, Johnny” or “Howdy, Reb” to Confederate soldiers on the other side of the picket line.

Johnny Reb has been used as a nickname for veteran Confederate soldiers, as well as to refer to white natives of the states that formerly belonged to the Confederacy. The sobriquet is still commonly used in scholarly writing by Southern and Northern authors; for example, Robert N. Rosen, a Jewish native of South Carolina who has written extensively about the roles Southern Jews played in the Confederate States Army, refers to “Jewish Johnny Rebs”. The term Johnny Reb is still used, not infrequently, in popular writing as well as in news media. In 2000, the Los Angeles Times published an article by the historian Eric Foner entitled, Chief Johnny Reb, in reference to Jefferson Davis, the Confederate president. A 2018 book review by historian Drew Gilpin Faust appeared in the Wall Street Journal under the title Billy Yank and Johnny Reb.

REB on Wikipedia