Incite

This time we are looking on the crossword clue for: Incite.
it’s A 6 letters crossword puzzle definition. See the possibilities below.

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Possible Answers: URGE, EON, ABET, STIR, EGG, PROD, SIC, IMPEL, SPUR, AROUSE, GOAD, ROUSE, EGGON, STOKE, SPARK, STIRUP, PROMPT, BESTIR, ACTUATE, URGEON, FOMENT, PROVOKE, FIREUP, GOADTOACTION.

Last seen on: –The Sun – Two Speed Crossword – Aug 13 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jul 24 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jun 13 2019
Newsday.com Crossword – May 24 2019
The Washington Post Crossword – May 5 2019
LA Times Crossword 5 May 19, Sunday
Wall Street Journal Crossword – Mar 2 2019 – Disemvoweled
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Feb 23 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Feb 21 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Dec 4 2018
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Nov 22 2018
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Oct 16 2018
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Aug 28 2018
Universal Crossword – July 15 2018 Sunday
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jul 4 2018
-Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jun 7 2018
-The Washington Post Crossword – June 2 2018
LA Times Crossword 2 Jun 2018, Saturday
-Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Nov 16 2017
-Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Nov 6 2017

Random information on the term “URGE”:

Ellen Victoria Futter (born September 21, 1949) is president of the American Museum of Natural History. She previously served as president of Barnard College for 13 years.

Futter was born in New York City and attended high school in Port Washington, New York. She spent two years at the University of Wisconsin–Madison before transferring to Barnard College, where she graduated Phi Beta Kappa magna cum laude in 1971. She was elected as a student representative to the Barnard’s board of trustees in 1971 and was subsequently elected to full membership to complete the term of Arthur Goldberg, former Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. Futter earned her J.D. from Columbia Law School in 1974.

Futter began her career as an associate at the Wall Street law firm of Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy, where she practiced corporate law. In 1980, Futter took a leave of absence from Milbank, Tweed to serve as Barnard’s acting president for one year. At the end of that period, she was appointed president of the college; at the time, she was the youngest president of any college in the United States. She served as president until 1993, when she joined the American Museum of Natural History.

URGE on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “EON”:

The geologic time scale (GTS) is a system of chronological dating that relates geological strata (stratigraphy) to time, and is used by geologists, paleontologists, and other Earth scientists to describe the timing and relationships of events that have occurred during Earth’s history. The table of geologic time spans, presented here, agrees with the nomenclature, dates and standard color codes set forth by the International Commission on Stratigraphy.

Evidence from radiometric dating indicates that Earth is about 4.54 billion years old. The geology or deep time of Earth’s past has been organized into various units according to events which took place in each period. Different spans of time on the GTS are usually marked by changes in the composition of strata which correspond to those, and indicate major geological or paleontological events, such as mass extinctions. For example, the boundary between the Cretaceous period and the Paleogene period is defined by the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event, which marked the demise of the non-avian dinosaurs and many other groups of life. Older time spans, which predate the reliable fossil record (before the Proterozoic eon), are defined by their absolute age.

EON on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “ABET”:

CSAB, Inc., formerly called the Computing Sciences Accreditation Board, Inc., is a non-profit professional organization in the United States, focused on the quality of education in computing disciplines. The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and the IEEE Computer Society (IEEE-CS) are the member societies of CSAB. The Association for Information Systems (AIS) was a member society between 2002 and September 2009.


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CSAB itself is a member society of ABET, to support the accreditation of several computing (related) disciplines:

Who is doing what:

The Computing Sciences Accreditation Board, Inc. (CSAB) was founded in 1984, with Taylor L. Booth as first president.

Initially, CSAB had its own accreditation commission called the Computer Science Accreditation Commission (CSAC). But in November 1998 CSAB and ABET agreed to integrate CSAB’s accreditation activities within ABET. The result is that in 2000 a reorganized CSAB became a member society of ABET and that, starting with the 2001-2002 cycle, a merged and renamed CSAC operates as the fourth commission of ABET: the Computing Accreditation Commission (CAC).

ABET on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “EGG”:

Eggs are laid by female animals of many different species, including birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fish, and have been eaten by humans for thousands of years. Bird and reptile eggs consist of a protective eggshell, albumen (egg white), and vitellus (egg yolk), contained within various thin membranes. The most popular choice for egg consumption are chicken eggs. Other popular choices for egg consumption are duck, quail, roe, and caviar.

Egg yolks and whole eggs store significant amounts of protein and choline, and are widely used in cookery. Due to their protein content, the United States Department of Agriculture categorizes eggs as Meats within the Food Guide Pyramid. Despite the nutritional value of eggs, there are some potential health issues arising from egg quality, storage, and individual allergies.

Chickens and other egg-laying creatures are widely kept throughout the world, and mass production of chicken eggs is a global industry. In 2009, an estimated 62.1 million metric tons of eggs were produced worldwide from a total laying flock of approximately 6.4 billion hens. There are issues of regional variation in demand and expectation, as well as current debates concerning methods of mass production. In 2012, the European Union banned battery husbandry of chickens.

EGG on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “PROD”:

A cattle prod, also called a stock prod, is a handheld device commonly used to make cattle or other livestock move by striking or poking them. An electric cattle prod is a stick with electrodes on the end which is used to make cattle move through a relatively high-voltage, low-current electric shock The electric cattle prod is said to have been invented by Texas cattle baron Robert J. Kleberg, Jr. of the King Ranch around 1930, although versions were sold as early as 1917.

Ranchers and farmers typically use the term “cattle prods” mainly to refer to simple non-electrified fiberglass or metal goads used to physically encourage cattle into motion; the majority of people living outside of rural areas use the term ‘cattle prod’ exclusively for the electrified variant. Most ranchers and farmers refer to electric cattle prods as “hotshots”[citation needed] (this is an example of a genericized trademark; one of the most prominent brands of electric prod is Hot-Shot).

In an electric cattle prod, which is the precursor to the modern day stun gun, dual surface electrodes produce a very high voltage/very low amperage electric arc between them, which, when pressed against conductive skin, produces a painful but superficial electric shock which stimulates the target to cease their current activity and move in the direction opposite the source of the pain. With higher amperage, the cattle prod is the equivalent of a stun gun and functions exactly the same way. Cattle prods are the precursor to direct contact electric stun guns used against humans, and their basic operating principles are the same: The major differences are primarily in the matter of size and power: cattle prods tend to have a higher electric current and a longer handle than stun guns, which is helpful when dealing with very large, powerful animals or humans as a torture device.

PROD on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “SIC”:

Sic (Hungarian: Szék; German: Secken) is a commune in Cluj County, Romania. It is composed of a single village, Sic.

At the 2011 census, 95.9% of inhabitants were Hungarians, 3.6% Romanians and 0.4% Roma. At the 2002 census, 75% were Hungarian Reformed, 10% Seventh Day Adventists, 6.6% Roman Catholics and 3.7% Romanian Orthodox.

SIC on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “SPUR”:

Spur (1913–1930) was an American thoroughbred racehorse. In 1916, he won eight major races and finished second in the Belmont Stakes. At age four, he equaled the Empire City track record for a mile and a sixteenth on the dirt in winning his second straight Yonkers Handicap. As a sire, standing at James Butler’s Eastview Farm in Tarrytown, New York, Spur’s best progeny was Sting.

Spur died on May 31, 1930 at Eastview Farm.

SPUR on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “SPARK”:

A spark is an incandescent particle. Such sparks may be produced by pyrotechnics, by metalworking or as a by-product of fires, especially when burning wood.

In pyrotechnics, iron filings and metal alloys such as magnalium may be used to create sparks. The quantity and style of sparks produced depends on the composition and pyrophoricity of the metal and can be used to identify the type of metal by spark testing. In the case of iron, the presence of carbon is required, as in carbon steel — about 0.7% is best for large sparks. The carbon burns explosively in the hot iron and this produces pretty, branching sparks. The color of sparks used in pyrotechnics is determined by the material that the sparks are made from, with the possibility of adding different chemical compounds to certain materials to further influence the color of the sparks. The duration of the existence of a spark is determined by the initial size of the particle, with a larger size leading to a longer-lasting spark.

SPARK on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “PROMPT”:

A command-line user interface (CLI), also known as a console user interface, and character user interface (CUI), is a means of interacting with a computer program where the user (or client) issues commands to the program in the form of successive lines of text (command lines). A program which handles the interface is called a command language interpreter or shell.

The CLI was the primary means of interaction with most computer systems until the introduction of the video display terminal in the mid-1960s, and continued to be used throughout the 1970s and 1980s on OpenVMS, Unix systems and personal computer systems including MS-DOS, CP/M and Apple DOS. The interface is usually implemented with a command line shell, which is a program that accepts commands as text input and converts commands into appropriate operating system functions.

Command-line interfaces to computer operating systems are less widely used by casual computer users, who favor graphical user interfaces or menu-driven interaction.

PROMPT on Wikipedia